All posts by Alex Smith

Soccer Team hustles into new season

By: Alex Smith/Staff Writer  

Photo Caption: Hunter Stine, #17,  tries to stop #19 on the Pendleton Heights boys varsity soccer team from scoring a goal during a game last season. Photo by John Kennedy

    The boys varsity soccer team, four-peat sectional champs, have gotten off to a bit of a slower start this season with two wins, four losses and two ties so far. This season they are facing tougher teams such as the Lawrence North Bobcats, and the team did not get to have the club soccer experience in the off-season like they usually do due to the pandemic.

    Despite a few struggles, they are seeing some success in leadership and growth. Assistant Coach Micah Gerike said, “The biggest thing that has led to the soccer team’s success is that the players have bought into the program. They listen to the coaching staff and believe in the information that they are being coached.” Gerike said, “We have had several players step up to fill roles of last year’s seniors. Many of these players have not had much experience at the varsity level, but they are able to still have the support from the other players.”

    John Halvorsen, 11, number 15 on the team who plays center midfielder on the team, had several things that he enjoys about the soccer season. He said, “I would say the bond between my teammates that I have is my favorite thing. It brings a certain level of security knowing that I have brothers next to me at all times.” Soccer is often like a family for the coaches and players. Gerike said, “I think that the biggest strength is the “family” mentality. Everyone on the team and in our program is treated as a family member. Family members don’t always get along with each other, but they will always be there for each other when needed. A needed improvement in my opinion is that they need to make this season their own and not try to compare it to previous seasons.” 

 Hunter Stine, 10,  number 17 on the team who plays center back on the team, said there are many benefits to being on the soccer team. Soccer also has a main benefit. Halvorsen said, “The main advantage of playing soccer is just being in shape. It’s really good for your physical health and I think that is a big role in feeling good about yourself.” 

Coaching has some advantages to it. Gerike said, “Networking. Because of coaching soccer: I got my teaching job, I have met friends, I have traveled the country and I have met professional athletes.” 

    Playing soccer also has many challenges at times. Halvorsen said, “I would say the biggest challenge is playing through adversity, meaning a team could be better than us or the refs just are not the best refs out there. You have to have a strong mindset to be able to do so.” Playing soccer has another challenge to it. Stine said, “Being in shape is one of the many challenges in soccer. In high school varsity matches, we play 40 minute halves. You are running up and down the field the entire time, so you have to be in very good shape. Another challenge is being able to keep your head up. Sometimes you could be getting beat 4-0, and you just have got to keep your head up and keep playing, no matter the score.” 

Coaching soccer can also have obstacles to it. Gerike said, “One challenge I have as a coach/teacher is being able to draw the line between being in the classroom and being on the field. Another challenge that I think most coaches face is being able to keep a positive and energetic attitude at practice after a long day at work.”

    Gerike said, “My favorite thing about coaching soccer is being able to share my knowledge and passion for soccer with others.” Stine’s least favorite thing about playing soccer is the constant risk of injury. But it doesn’t slow him down. Halvorsen said, “I focus on getting my mind set on the game and the game only. I listen to music and get pumped up to play. I make sure I am fully stretched out and loose so I know I’m ready to go.”

    Stine said, “I usually focus my mind and listen to some music, and just think of game-like situations in my head to prepare. I also try to keep myself calm because if I’m nervous I make mistakes.” 

Gerike and the other coaches let the players set individual and team goals they would like to achieve. His goal for this season is to have players step up and take vacant roles on their own. 

    Gerike said, “I enjoy watching players develop over time and seeing how their thought  process evolves with their style of play. I also miss playing soccer and for me coaching is the next best way to stay involved.” Gerike said, “My least favorite thing about coaching soccer is handling the paperwork and the more organizational tasks that are required.” 

Stine summed up what makes all the challenges and ups and downs worth it.  “When I play, I forget about all my problems and hardships of the day. It’s my stress reliever.”

Coach Wiley helps girls golf team in another successful year

By: Tyler Young/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Coach Wiley is focused at his desk while doing virtual teaching. Photo by: Tyler Young

Head coach of the varsity girls and boys golf team Russ Wiley is looking for more outstanding seasons to add to his belt of previous successes. Coach Wiley is not only a teacher and golf coach, but also a family man. He lives with his wife and three daughters.

Coach Wiley is from the south side of Indianapolis and graduated in 2001 from Roncalli High School. Coach Wiley attended Indiana University of Bloomington where he had a major in Secondary Education and returned to Ball State in 2011 for his M.A. in Political Science. In his fourteenth year of teaching World History, Wiley has been the head coach of girls’ varsity golf for 11 years now, and in his seventh year of coaching boys’ golf. Coach Wiley has been the head coach of Greenfield Central’s girls’ varsity for 11 years now and in his 7th year for the varsity boys’ golf.

Coach Wiley has had past success and showed coaching skill with both golf teams, including a 16-1 season last year with the girls and a regional appearance with the boys golf team. “The girls have been working really hard and showed me their potential, talents, and love for the game of golf. They  have no doubt that all that hard work is put into practice and off time.” That was Coach Wiley on the topic of the girls’ hard work and hopes for the coming season.

Caroline Gibson, 12, had positive comments to say about Coach Wiley. “Coach Wiley is a wonderful coach; he has put a lot of confidence into my talents and that is what makes him a great coach and person,” Gibson  said.

Coach Wiley said, “This pandemic is new to all of us. The girls are doing their utmost best to get some practice and playing time even if we don’t finish this season.”  The work that this team has put in has shown as Gibson is leading her team in a promising way this fall. They are 13-3 as they head into Sectionals on Monday, Sept. 21.

 Boys’ golf team member Josh Alley, grade 10,  also had positive words to say about Coach Wiley’s leadership. He stated, “Coach Wiley is an amazing person and coach. He has been calm and patient through the pandemic and cancellation of our season last year. He had a really good team and is hoping to go for the state title this year.”

Profile: Mosser highlights challenges of first year teaching during pandemic

Photo Caption: Mosser teaches her German 1 class. Photo by Alex Smith

Ms. Jordan Mosser is in her first year of teaching German at GC, and what a start it has been: a pandemic, a switch to half-in person, half-hybrid learning, and all the responsibilities that come with those factors.   

   Mosser talked about her transition from college to the classroom. “The biggest challenge is I’m on my own and I don’t have another teacher helping  me so being on my own and planning everything is the biggest challenge,” Mosser said. This alone isn’t an easy task but the pressures of being a year one teacher are tremendous especially during a pandemic. For Mosser, it might not be that bad: “Being a first year teacher especially after having another teacher with me for so long is a bit challenging but the pandemic is the saving grace because everyone knows it’s a learning curve,” she said.

Madame Amanda Brown, French teacher, commented on how Mosser was doing in the new environment.  “I think she’s doing a fantastic job. I’ve enjoyed talking to her about GC as a whole and the virtual experience. I really enjoy getting and sharing ideas with her,” Brown said. 

   When choosing the school where she wanted to teach, Mosser looked for something close to friends, Greenfield-Central being a good option: “I was looking for a school to teach in Indiana and I liked how (Greenfield) was near Indianapolis but not in the city,” Mosser stated. 

Mosser usually has high expectations for herself but this year has made things difficult: “I have high expectations for myself because that’s just me as a person. I want to get you guys (the students) to where you need to be but this year I may not being able to do that so it’s all about setting reasonable expectations,” Mosser said, understanding this year’s circumstances with the pandemic.

“I would love for her to work at GCHS for a long time. I expect that she makes everyone accountable and responsible for her work. I expect her to motivate others and to be the best teacher she can possibly be,” said Michael Runions,10, who enjoys Mosser’s class. 

Brown talked about having a younger teacher like Mosser in the department “Having a younger teacher is always a benefit because they’re more aware of what the kids are into and the slang,”  Brown said. 

Runions said having a younger teacher has some advantages. “ I definitely think it will be easier. I think she’s been through just as much as we have. Since she’s so young, she can understand us a lot better.”

It seems all three of them are on the same page: “I think so because I get what’s going through your head unlike some of your other teachers. I told my students that if they needed to talk about anything they could come to me,” Mosser said. 

This year presented the challenge of the hybrid schedule, half in person, half virtual. This is new to Mosser.  Mosser said there were personal struggles in teaching virtually: “Yes (there are), because when you guys went virtual in the spring I was student teaching so I wasn’t able to teach virtually so everything I’m learning is from the other teachers.”

         “She does very well with helping students. If we make mistakes she goes back and explains how we could’ve found the correct answers,” Runions said. It seems as though Mosser has crushed this challenge: “She makes sure to challenge us and makes class more fun,” he continued to say. 

     Meeting new people can be rough for some people; in this situation it’s not the case for Mosser. Mosser discussed how it was meeting the other language teachers. “It was nice because they’ve been so welcoming and they are everything I want in a language department.” 

Mosser is the new face in the department and it is sad one chapter is ending but happy another is beginning. “It’s both happy and sad. I was very close with Frau Cathy Clements (the previous German teacher) but Frau Mosser is fantastic and I’m thrilled to work with her,” Madame Brown said. It’s good to leave a good first impression and that’s exactly what Mosser did. “Gosh, she’s tall, I’m jealous but she’s very nice, confident, and easy to talk to,” Brown said. Mosser is leaving good impressions on her students as well. “She is a nice person. She doesn’t assign homework unless we need it and she does not get off topic very much,” said Ian Gross, 10. He’s not the only one: “She’s a good teacher and good at explaining stuff and she’s super understanding when we don’t understand things,” said Kensleigh Fairley, 10.

Footloose Publicity Crew Goes to Work

by Abby Morgan/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: David Hull, 10,  Jessica Rudd, 9, Elizabeth Harris, 12,  and Camden Fitzgerald, 9, are in the publicity crew for the drama club.

The publicity crew is as busy as ever, setting up for Footloose, with setting up locker decorations, making the playbill, and putting up posters around the school. Elizabeth Harris, 12, is the head of this crew and loves her job. Some of her favorite parts of this position are decorating the lobby before shows, leading her fellow peers, and meeting new people every year. With the nice parts, there are always the downsides. “For me, I’m in the show, co-head of paint, and head of publicity so it’s really important that I have other people to rely on for work to get done,” Harris said.

This crew usually does the same things for every show, just different things to spice it up and make it unique. Another big help is Mrs. Carolyn Voigt, the drama director. “I like working with her because she’s really nice and helps bring everything together. She also helps come up with ideas for us and helps with the playbill because it’s so difficult to make and put together,” said Harris. 

Almost every show, there are new faces running around either in the crews or as actors on stage. Harris said, “I really like working with new people, it’s exciting because you obviously get to meet new faces and help them with their work.” 

Addie Coombs, 9, has never been in publicity before; instead she has been in paint. “I originally decided to join publicity just in case my main crew choice, paint, was full but now that I’ve worked with Elizabeth for a while I’ve stayed to help give the show as much good publicity and attention as possible.”  Coombs also adds, “I don’t believe the publicity crew gets enough recognition, but then again all of the tech crews in drama productions don’t get recognition just because all of the crews are the basis of such a good show and back up actors.”

Of course, this crew is needed just as much as any other crew. Without them, you would not see posters, hear announcements, or see locker decorations. Camden Fitzgerald, 9, is also doing publicity for the first time this show. “I think my favorite part is most likely the people because they make it so much fun while doing the (sometimes tedious) work.” 

With rehearsals only starting a few weeks ago, this crew has already put in many hours of work. With the show being in May, they will work toward getting the job done.

Profile: Rosing balances school life, home life

by Mya Wilcher/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Mrs. Rosing helps Lauren Blasko, 9, with an essay on her iPad.  Photo by Mya Wilcher

Mrs. Laken Rosing has been learning even more about time management than she already knew as the days go by. She is an English teacher and a coach for the high school’s cheerleading team as well as an expectant mom of twins. Learning to juggle her home life, her school life, and her pregnancy has proven to be a new challenge. 

Rosing went to school in Kentucky and found a love for teaching. Carah Brown, 9, is one of her students. Brown said, “I think others could learn simple kindness from Mrs. Rosing.” Brown said that being in Rosing’s class is very good and will be very useful in future years. Brown also said, “One thing that I love about her class is that she always makes me personally feel welcome and that I actually belong in her class.” 

Another one of Rosing’s students, Anna Kunkel, 9, has a very good relationship with her. Kunkel said that Rosing uses her time well and teaches or lets the students work for the class period. “She has her classes well organized with a structured agenda.” Students have had many writing assignments throughout the school year in her class and have grown as writers said Kunkel. Her students have learned how to write good essays and manage their work.

Kunkel said, “Students can learn from her not only English, but how to keep your thoughts and work organized. She helps kids learn how to be more productive and manage their time well.” Rosing’s class has plenty of material and assignments to keep students on their feet. Kunkel said that if students were to not do their work, their grade would certainly show it. Kunkel also said, “I love how she doesn’t baby us. She talks to us as adults, and in the last few minutes of class we can almost always have a polite conversation about anything. She can go from talking about how stupid Romeo and Juliet are, to having a debate with us over what Disney princesses are original and which ones aren’t.” 

Rosing said that her first year of teaching was very different, because she didn’t teach at Greenfield; it was in Louisville, Kentucky. The school was much larger, the demographics were different, and they also had seven classes a day unlike the four classes at GC. In general her first year was more stressful. Teaching is something that one must know they want to truly put themselves into, she said.  Rosing said, “I knew I wanted to be a teacher when I graduated high school. I knew that I always wanted to work with people and provide a service for people. I love writing and English and that just made the most sense to me. I also really liked reading at a young age.” 

Teaching also comes with struggles as anything else does. Rosing said that one thing she has found to be challenging is balancing boundaries. It’s taken her some time to learn when she can say no to things as she likes to try to do it all. And now that she is married and is expecting children, it’s something that she has learned that needs boundaries for personal life too and to make sure everything is distributed, she said. 

One very bright side of a teacher’s career is the memories and connections with students. Rosing said, “One thing that I really love is when I get an email from a student who is in college telling me that they have good grades and thanking me, when they’re able to reflect on the class.” 

She also recalled, “One year I came in and my students had thrown me a surprise birthday party. It was a great personal memory and my students were very thoughtful.” 

Some students come into the class excelling in English and more, said Rosing. So she tries to push them even further with their skills. This can sometimes be a challenge for her as well as the student as she has to find new ways to help that student grow from their previous knowledge. 

Since Rosing is expecting children, there have been some extra challenges that she has had to navigate. When she goes home, she has to decide whether to grade some assignments, or go relax and she has to make decisions based on what is better for the babies. “I’ve just given myself schedules. On one day, I’ll grade this many things, and on this day I’ll grade this many things. As long as I meet those schedules, then I haven’t met any situations where I felt like I stayed up too late.” 

All of this and more had led Rosing to where she is now. Through all the successes and struggles she has continued to thrive and juggle her home life with her school life. Using time management and schedules as she stated has aided her in this process.

Disney Theory: Are characters actually family?

by Abigail Castetter/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: The writer explores theories of related Disney characters from movie to movie. 

Maybe you’ve seen a video or two on your ‘for you’ page or maybe while watching these shows you wondered how they tied into the universe. Fan theories are that Frozen, Tangled, and Tarzan are thought to be related in some ways. Some may call these far-fetched but who’s to say they’re not possible?

Disney fans and theorists suggest Elsa, Anna, and Tarzan could be siblings. During the beginning of the first Frozen movie, Elsa and Anna’s parents, Queen Iduna and King Agnarr, leave for a two week trip. At some point their ship is wrecked during a severe storm and they die. But, what if they hadn’t actually died?

After the “death” of Elsa and Anna’s parents Elsa eventually comes of age to become queen a few years later. The coronation takes place and many people come far and wide to see the two girls after so many years and to celebrate the event, During Anna’s singing of First Time in Forever you can see a glimpse of Rapunzel and Eugene at the front gates. Theories suggest that Elsa, Anna, and Rapunzel are all cousins related from the mother’s side of the family. “Of course Rapunzel and Eugene would be at Elsa’s coronation, what kind of cousin would she be if she missed that ceremony?” states YouTuber, Brandon McPherson.

Elsa, Anna, and Rapunzel share similarities in their appearances and so do Elsa and Anna’s mother, Queen Iduna, and Rapuzel’s mother, Queen Arianna. Even with distance the two queen sisters must have been close. Many timestamps within the Frozen, Tangled, and Tarzan movies line up and none would be too far fetched.

In 2015 in an ‘Ask Reddit,’ fans asked the directors, Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck (who also directed Tarzan), where the Queen and King were going. Chris Buck stated, “They didn’t die on the boat. They got washed up on a shore in a jungle island. The queen gave birth to a baby boy. They build a treehouse. They get eaten by a leopard ….” Jennifer Lee simply stated they were heading to a wedding. This can suggest the King and Queen were possibly going to Rapunzel and Eugene’s wedding, and when the boat “crashed” it had actually floated for a while which could give plenty of time for a baby, Tarzan, to be born and to change the shown visual appearances of the king by Tarzan’s birth. Elsa could have possibly known that her mother was pregnant and that could be why she had been worried about their leave.

There are many more extra theories many Disney theorists have connected. Some extra theories suggest Rapunzel and Elsa are twins and another suggests the ship in The Little Mermaid is the ship that had belonged to Queen Iduna and King Agnarr. Disney writers and directors like to make connections between their many princesses and other creations. Though, many theories were debunked in the second Frozen movie which came out late 2019. Instead of heading south like thought, Queen Iduna and King Agnarr were actually heading north to try and figure more out about Elsa’s powers when they really did die which cancels the Tarzan brother theory.  “While Disney keeps quiet on any official canon, the theories are all in the name of fun, and using a bit of imagination in between releases,” stated the YouTube channel ScreenRant.

 

Profile: Grizzard details day in life of choir director

by Alex Smith/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Mr. Paul Grizzard directs Concert Choir during G2.

Choir director Paul Grizzard’s favorite dad joke is a new one. He hasn’t told it on stage yet: “A local man is addicted to drinking brake fluid. He says he can stop any time,” said Grizzard, who is known for dad jokes.

Isaac Kottlowski, 12, who is in the madrigal choir, said, “My favorite dad joke that Mr. Grizzard has told is ‘What do you call a fish with no eyes? A fsh!’”

Grizzard has been teaching at GC for four years. Prior to coming to Greenfield, he taught high school for ten years in Rushville. He has an identical twin brother named Mark, who lives in Illinois. Grizzard and Mark didn’t find out that they were identical twins until they were both 30 years old.

Grizzard started being a choir director when he was in high school. He really likes music and feels like that’s where his talent is. But when Grizzard was in college, he didn’t go into education. He got a Bachelor’s degree in music and math at Augustana College at Rock Island, IL. After college he went back to school at Ball State and got his teaching certificate. Grizzard taught in Boston, Massachusetts for a few years while he was getting licensed and he then taught at Rushville for ten years before coming here.

Grizzard said his favorite part of being a choir director is that he likes seeing kids who come their freshman year and graduate their senior year just to see how they grow up both as singers and as young adults.  He loves seeing the progress from start to finish.

Kottlowski said he admires Grizzard for several reasons. “My favorite thing about Mr. Grizzard is how he directs others to be able to be successful because what he’s been doing is he’s making me a leader to be able to make others leaders,” said Kottlowski.

Kottlowski continued, “I am going to miss the atmosphere because every choir is different. Even if I went to college for the Purdue Glee Club it’s going to be different because there won’t be anybody directing you by yourself.”

Accompanist David Hanson, who has worked with Grizzard for four years, said, “My favorite thing about Mr. Grizzard is that he is a perfectionist and he wants to get the best from his singers. We are both compatible and perfectionists and we both want to have the best musical productions ever.”

Hanson said, “My first impression of Mr. Grizzard was at an audition so it was kind of frightening but he put me at ease and told me what I needed to do.”

Grizzard said that he gets along pretty well with his students.“My most embarrassing moment as a teacher is that I remember being on stage announcing a song and I said ‘Okay their next song is…’ and I had a senior moment and I turned around and the kids told me what song we were singing next,” he said.

Grizzard said that his least favorite part of being a choir director is that motivation is tough. It’s hard to get kids excited to be doing things and riding the line between having a strict class and having fun. It’s always a tough balance, he said.

Kottlowski said, “My favorite part of being in choir is being able to sing with my peers and to have a fun time and to be engaged within the music. My least favorite part of being in choir is that sometimes when something goes wrong during a concert you have to adapt and overcome the circumstances of what may happen.”

Outside of teaching, Grizzard likes to go running, he likes to go to concerts with his wife, he likes taking his kids to places like the museum and the zoo, and he likes to work in his garage building little projects. Grizzard talked about how he balanced his work and home life. He said it was difficult these days because he has a five year and a two year old at home, that they require a lot of attention, and that it takes scheduling, and setting time aside for both work and family.

While Grizzard helps to inspire others, he also discussed people who have influenced him. Grizzard said, “My mentor is my mom because she inspired me to get into music and she is a strong woman. My father just passed away. Even though he is gone, she still mentors my family whenever we come to her.”

Speaking of family, choir is often like family for the students. Kottlowski said that his least favorite dad joke that Mr. Grizzard has told is when someone complains, he says, ‘Hi! I’m dad.’