Category Archives: feature

Profile: students enjoy listening to fields’ “classroom stories,” passion for science

by Andrew Love/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Fields’ class works outside.

Biology teacher Ms. Rebecca Fields has been involved with teaching and extracurricular activities since she began her career here at Greenfield Central. Fields has been known to help out with things like SLA, JSA, Genetics and Engineering, and Robotics club. So who is this “laid back” teacher as former GC student Preston Evans called her, and how has she impacted the school and students?

Teaching for 15 years at our school, Fields has gotten to know the students and staff better than most and it shows as she is very well respected. Students enjoy listening to her “classroom stories, as it makes class interesting and whatever is going on that day just comes out,” says John Stuckey, 10.  

Before getting her masters degree in Biology she worked in business. After getting her masters degree in biology going from Purdue to IU, she transferred to a teaching program and became a registered teacher about a year later. She enjoys the challenge of being a teacher and seeing all of the students’ different perspectives. “I enjoy trying to make unmotivated students motivated,” says Mrs. Fields. Students like that she is relatable and easy to talk to. 

“I always enjoyed how passionate she was about any type of science I talked to her about,” says Evans. Fields says, “I took every single science class I was offered in high school.”  

John Stuckey, 10, says, “Whether we were talking about biology, money, life, whatever it was she was knowledgeable about and could help you out.”

 Students enjoy how her classes are not just “boring homework” as John Stuckey says it, and more about “real biology hands on lab,” as Fields states. Even for the students that were not totally into science, she is usually still able to talk and relate to them about sports or other activities after helping outside of school, for example being an assistant swim coach and a driver’s ed driver.

Whether you had Fields or not, she is a veteran teacher here at GC and wants the best for each student and staff member. “Once I leave I want to know that I helped people here from all ages have a better time during the school year,” she said.

Profile: Mosser helps as teacher, exchange student adviser

by Trot Scholl/Staff Writer

Ms. Jordan Mosser is one of the foreign language teachers in the high school. Many students at Greenfield think she is a great teacher. Student Bryson Pratt, 12,  says, “She teaches very well. She goes in depth about her work she assigns. Every time I have a question about the assignment she answers it very well so I can understand.”

At first she did not plan on being a teacher. She said, “Originally I did not want to be a teacher but I told myself if I was going to study German then I would either be in teaching or in business.” Ms. Mosser was very close to switching her major to elementary education but decided that working with kids around high school age fit her better. She was always pushed by her old German teacher at her high school. “My German teacher kept pushing me to learn and keep using German, but she never pushed me to be a German teacher.”

 While yes at first Ms. Mosser didn’t want to be a teacher, this doesn’t mean she doesn’t enjoy teaching. She stated, “I like helping students learn German and other things that aren’t German and other things about the world so you can be young and functioning adults in the world. At the end of the day, I know most of you won’t use German after highschool but I like to see my students challenge themselves.” 

Ms. Mosser also helps with the foreign exchange students. “I think it’s fun to see how they react to American culture and how they react to American schools. I think it’s fun to work with kids from other places because they have other perspectives on the world,” Mosser stated.

Ms. Mosser is very fluent in German and can help students learn German very easily with her help. Pratt said, “Since she is so fluent, she can teach it very well to where I can understand the work.” She helps as many of her students to understand the subject as she can and explains her assignments very well.

Ms. Mosser is a very good teacher with helping other students, helping the foreign exchange students and many other things. Ms. Mosser, who wasn’t planning on being a teacher in the first place, is a very helpful instructor at the high school.

New FACS Teacher, GC Grad brings new ideas to classroom

by Justice Hyde/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Ms. Mikayla Bowman works in her FACS classroom. Photo by Justice Hyde

GCHS’s newest FACS teacher Mikayla Bowman is a former GC graduate who just became a certified teacher at the start of this school year. When she was a student at GC she took every FACS class she could, and in fact she currently works with many of her old FACS teachers. Ms. Bowman has only been teaching for a month, but she is already being described as “fantastic” by fellow FACS teacher Mrs. Sandy Powell. But there is much more to Ms. Bowman than what meets the eye.

Ms. Bowman’s mom was a teacher, so she spent much of her childhood in classrooms, and has always been enthusiastic about teaching. “I always wanted to help around the classroom or grade papers,” Bowman stated. Mrs. Bowman coaches the GCHS dance team, and has been coaching since before she became a teacher, so she’s always been active in GC schools. 

Ms. Bowman graduated from GCHS in 2017. When asked what made her decide to come back to GC schools as a teacher, Bowman asked, “Why wouldn’t a teacher want to teach at the same school they graduated from?” She described how amazing it is to be working in the exact classroom she fell in love with FACS in. 

Ms. Bowman puts amazing amounts of effort into her job even having only been here for a few weeks. Mrs. Powell, a fellow FACS teacher, complimented her by describing her with terms like passionate, creative, and intelligent. She is well liked by her students, with many naming her their favorite teacher even having only known her for a few weeks. “When some of my students were asked what class they looked forward to the most, many of them said my FACS class,” Ms. Bowman said.

Bowman is already known throughout the student body for her fun and energetic way of teaching. She always manages to keep class interesting and fun, while still making sure students are able to learn all that they need to be successful in her class. 

Guidance welcomes two new counselors

by Aidan Bow/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Mrs. Sarah Graham is the new director of counseling.

This year at GCHS we have two new counselors. Both of them have skills that are helpful to our school; they are a resource for students that need help whether it’s with schedules or mental health.

 Mrs. Sarah Graham,  GCHS director of counseling, is a new counselor at GCHS. Before joining the GCHS counseling team she worked at Warsaw Community High School in Indiana, as the counseling director of the school.

She grew up in Wabash, Indiana and graduated from Northfield High School. Later in her life she went to Wesleyan University, where she got her bachelor’s degree in social work and criminal justice. She also has two masters in community mental health and school counseling.

 Mrs. Graham is new to the team but she is already hard at work making our school a better place. About the amount stress she started with in the job, she stated,“The first couple weeks were stressful but it’s smooth now.”

Once they got through most of the students schedules, her stress shrunk significantly and she was able to settle down for the new school year. When asked about Mrs. Graham Mrs. Sherri Foster, a GCHS counselor stated, “Mrs Graham has a lot of new ideas to bring to our community and school.”

Mrs. Sheleatha Aldridge works at her desk.

This is Mrs. Sheleatha Aldridge’s first year here. She used to work at Muncie Southside Middle School; she worked there for 2 years. She grew up in Springport, IN. Mrs. Aldridge graduated from Blue River Valley Jr/Sr High School. After graduating she went to Purdue University where she got her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Civil Engineering. For a brief period she was a structural engineer before she went to IUPUI to get her masters degree in Counselor Education and an Ed in Counseling degree.

She is the mother of three children. When asked if setting up high school schedules was stressful she responded with, “It was stressful as the high school has way more classes than the middle school where I used to work.” She stated afterwards however she likes the challenge it poses.

Mrs. Foster also commented on how Mrs. Aldridge is handling things, stating, “She is good with middle schoolers but is learning to deal with high schoolers. Mrs. Aldridge has a great attitude.”

“I’m excited to have them on the team,” Mrs. Foster said.

Profile: Cheerleading Coach Carey builds “legacy of Cougar cheerleading”

By Della Hedge/ Staff Writer

Photo Caption: These are the 2022-2023 cheerleaders, ready to start the new season.

Motivating, character building, challenging, these are the words Coach Christy Carey gave to describe her coaching style. She has been cheering for years; she cheered at her high school and middle school.  She also has cheered at regional, national and world levels. After that she cheered at the collegiate level at Purdue University. This is her fourth school for coaching and she is still an active cheerleader today. Safe to say she is pretty qualified. 

Cheering made her who she is; she loves teaching the next generation of young cheerleaders. She loves challenging young student athletes. “Greenfield Central seemed like a special place to grow the legacy of Cougar cheerleading,” she said. Coach Carey wants to take the cheer program into the better light. She said, “Cheerleaders are often given a bad reputation even though it might not be deserved.” She wants to build a community; one of her goals is to get the cheerleaders into the community around us while building a community in the cheer program. 

“Coaches I have had in the past are my driving force to be the best coach I can be,” Coach Carey strives everyday to be the best coach she can be. “I think I was surprised at how welcomed I was, how excited the girls were and the parents and staff”.  After the last basketball season everything was up in the air for the cheerleading program and having someone who came in and completely flipped it was new and exciting not only for the cheerleaders but the parents too. This being Coach Carey’s 4th school she was ready to take on the Cougar cheerleading program.  And every cheerleader or parent was ready for the ride. 

“I love my girls so much,” Carey stated. When asked what she loves the most about her cheerleaders she says “I loved how hard we worked for 3 months with a rocky start and everyone buying into my vision and my mission”. She was hired right before summer, not much time to plan or organize everything. In cheerleading you need time to prepare and plan and she wasn’t given much time at all and was hired by herself. She did get one coach hired just in time for summer, Coach Logan. 

Coach Logan Gruell is a third generation Greenfield grad, and cheered all throughout high school. “Coach Carey and I have similar coaching styles, which makes us such a great team. I am really enjoying getting to learn from Coach Carey with the experience that she has.” Coach Logan and Coach Carey have very similar goals for the team. Which makes the cheerleading team run even smoother. 

Coach Hanna Collins is the head JV coach, she was also a cheerleader at GCHS. She was offered a position from Coach Logan. “I really wanted to be back involved with cheer at the school I graduated from.” This is her first coaching high school level cheerleaders. She also had noticed some changes then vs now. “The only differences I have noticed are the closeness of the team mates. It seems like everyone is friends with someone from the opposite like JV is friends with some on varsity or vice versa”. Not only is this a great thing, but it also gives the JV team someone to look up to. Coach Collins will do great things not only for the program as a whole but progress the JV team in any way she can. 

Coach Carey is not only influential on cheerleaders but coaches too. “Given that I had not had previous experience coaching high school aged kids I wanted to take on her style and build my own style off of hers” says JV head coach Collins. Coach Carey alongside her other coaches has really made a space for cheerleaders to really succeed, “I think she has already changed the program for the better, she’s given us a cheer family where we all feel at home” sophomore and 2nd year varsity member Maddi Bowman states. 

The cheerleading program has gone through so much change in the past years but Coach Carey is hopefully a great and last change for a while. Coach Carey has really made a space where cheerleaders can just be cheerleaders. That is a something that not only was needed but long awaited and just in time for the seniors last year. 

Exchange students compare, contrast US, Home Countries

by Audrey Marguet/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Ms. Jordan Mosser speaks with Ainara Flores Garcia, one of the exchange students. Photo by Audrey Marguet

“Wow, that was my dream,” said Rosalia Golen, one of the eight exchange students of Greenfield Central who left their country, family and friends to come here and live the famous American dream for the next 9 months. Coming to a new country could be exciting but sometimes the adaptation is very hard. Making new friends, speaking another language and working for school is not that easy, from what the students said.

Golen is 17 years old and comes from Poland. She arrived in the US July 26, only 9 days before the beginning of school. For the moment, she really loves life in the United States. “You can choose your classes, it’s amazing!” she said. Schools in the USA are really different from the others, you can choose your classes,have to change rooms between every block…  “In Poland, every year we have the same classes with the same people.” Another different thing here is sport and the other different clubs in school. Almost every student is engaged in one of them, and most of the parents are very invested in it. In European schools, it’s pretty rare to find such a varied list of clubs and sports teams in one school.

Going on an exchange year is a big decision to take, for the student who’ll leave their home country to live in a place where they don’t know anybody but also for the parents, who won’t be able to see their child for 10 months. However this experience is exciting. It could also be very hard, family, friends, house, everything they left home, most of the students are going to miss it very much. 

“I think the hardest thing is not having public transportation,” Ms Jordan Mosser, GC’s German teacher who also works with the international students, said, “they have to be a lot more reliant on their host parent, or friends.” European students are habituated to be able to go almost everywhere by bus or trains. Coming here is a big change for them because you have to drive to get around; there’s no public transportation. 

“It usually takes about a month for them to get fully comfortable,” Ms. Mosser said.

Cultural differences are pretty big between Europe and America, in school but not just school. From what the students say, everything here is bigger: schools, roads, cities,… For them, the thing they’re probably going to miss the most is food. Living 10 months without eating the food that they ate during all their life can be difficult.

But when you have a dream, nothing can stop you. Three years ago, Lorenzo Pedroni, from Italy, came with his family to visit the USA for one month, and then, came the idea of this exchange year. Now he’s here in Greenfield, and more than happy to be. He’s even going to try out for the basketball team.

Student Profile: senior tech head reminisces over moments in drama department

By Megan Bundy/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Addie Coombs, 12, paints a wall for You Can’t Take It With You.

Addie Coombs, 12, has been the tech head of the paint crew for the drama department since her sophomore year, given the position suddenly after the cancellation of GC Drama’s 2020 spring musical, Footloose, during her freshman year. Despite the abrupt change, Coombs said she isn’t complaining; being tech head has been super fun for her. 

When Coombs started high school in August 2019, she said she didn’t know what to expect at first. “I don’t remember everything, but I think I was way more nervous for high school than I was excited.” Coombs said. She also remarks on why she decided to join theater her freshman year. “I really wanted to be involved in something, since I heard so many teachers tell me to get involved in things or else my high school career would be really boring.”

One of Coombs’ best friends since the 7th grade, Abby Morgan, 12, is also involved in the drama department as part of the paint crew to help paint the set in productions. When asked her best moments in theater with Coombs, she said, “One of my best moments with Addie in theater would be my first show, Cheaper by the Dozen. Our paint head at the time would always put us together on jobs and we’d always laugh together.” Morgan also says that she’s learned a lot of things from Coombs, including how to be more kind to herself and others around her. “She’s always been the nicest person I’ve ever known, and I’d like to think some of it has rubbed off on me.”

Carolyn Voigt, an English teacher and drama director at GC, has worked with Coombs during shows as well. Voigt describes her as passionate and a kind leader, having the ability to lead a group without being authoritative during shows. “Addie meets deadlines, and communicates and delegates tasks to her team well,” Voigt mentioned while commenting on Coombs’ leadership qualities. Voigt mentioned several reasons why Coombs was okayed to become a tech head for the program. “Addie always asked what she could do to help the production, even if it was extra work. She showed initiative, and she got along well with others. She was/is dependable.”

For her last season of shows in the drama department, Coombs is looking forward to many things with her crew. “I’ve always loved hanging out with my crew and spending hours upon hours with them, especially during tech weeks when we don’t have much to do other than talk with each other and enjoy each other’s company. So I’m really looking forward to the final few times I get to do that!”

Now as a senior, Coombs said, “Being a senior is so incredibly weird.  Obviously it’s really nice because I know the rounds of the school, teachers aren’t as cautious/strict, things like that. One of the main things I’ve noticed is that the fear and self consciousness you feel when you start out as an underclassman is completely gone.” When asked what advice Coombs would give to younger students, she said “My advice is to try and make friends! Don’t stick to just one or two people, try and branch out and really throw yourself out there. Being in high school is so much more fun when you have people by your side who you enjoy talking to.”

Profile: A closer look at GC’s lunch ladies

by Madi Burns/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Lunch ladies prepare lunch for students and staff at GC.

Lunch ladies and cafeteria workers, who normally get lesser recognition, have stories to tell, just like teachers and staff. An example would be Ali Stine, dishroom worker and former cashier, who has been a part of Greenfield Central for 8 years. 

Ali Stine, a mother of 3 and dishroom worker, cares a lot about GC students. “I love the interaction with the kids. Probably way too much. I’m in the dish-room now, and I so miss it. I miss the interaction with my kids. I call you guys [students] my kids,” Stine said.

When Stine was young, she wanted to live in Florida, become an accountant, and drive a really nice car. However, when she took finite math, she realized that maybe accounting wasn’t for her. So she came to Greenfield Central, and became a cashier for the lunch line. 

Stine is inspired by being kind, and making a difference. “I want to be nice, like I want to make people happy.” She went on to say, “When I first started here, I was a cashier, and my goal was to get kids to talk. I wanted everyone to say hi. I started with maybe 5 kids saying it, and by the end of the year, I had 50 kids that said hi. I just wanted to make a difference.” 

Lunch ladies prepare lunch for students and staff at GC.

Stine shared the best advice she’d ever received. “There’s a difference between being kind and showing kindness. You have to know the difference. You have to truly be kind to people.” And her advice to younger generations here at GC and everywhere else, is to just be present. 

One thing Stine wishes people knew about her is that, “I care about everybody. I care too much.” A favorite of her personality is pretty much the same. “I’m always happy. I always smile. I’m always happy. Again, I care too much.” And it all wraps around to her love of GC. Stine’s favorite movie is the Notebook. “I love the Notebook. It reminds me of my grandparents.” She went on to tell her favorite book, which is the Bible. “I started reading the Bible, going to Bible studies, and I’m learning all about that, because it’s very life changing, and it’s something you can live on.” Stine also stated that her hero is her grandpa.

AP teachers provide better understanding Of AP

By: Hunter Baylous/Staff Writer

Photo Caption:

When students hear the term “Advanced Placement (AP) classes,” they might think of a hard, boring class that’s always assigning homework and taking notes. Some students will try to avoid these classes because they want to drift through high school without having to do a lot of work to graduate. After asking three teachers here about their AP classes, the hope is to provide a better understanding of taking an AP class.

AP classes are considered college level classes.  In these classes the teachers hold their students more accountable due to the students being considered college students. Within these classes the teachers are required to teach a lot of material as stated by Mr. Phil Leswing who teaches AP psychology. “The one thing about AP is that there is a lot of material, so oftentimes there is material that the students will have to work on outside of class,” he stated. Some students who do take these AP classes are hoping to use what they learn in that class and use it in their future, so taking the class will give them a better understanding of the material. 

Some students will choose to take an AP class because they want to do something with that topic in their career. When asked about this Mrs. Laken Rosing said, “My class (AP Language and Composition) is very much skills-based, so they get to take these reading, and writing, and even speaking and listening skills into basically any career. I have had students email me and say, ‘I have an A+ in my college writing class and I’m still remembering things I learned in AP.’” She has even had students go into STEM professions who tell her her AP class helps even when they didn’t think they would use English in STEM fields.

As stated earlier in the article, AP students are held to greater responsibility or accountability. Mrs. Laura Mann who teaches AP Statistics explained, “The students take on more of an ownership role and I provide feedback as they work through different concepts.” When asked about the teacher’s responsibility Mrs. Rosing stated, “I need to have good content knowledge meaning if they come to me and say ‘Mrs. Rosing I don’t understand this,’ I need to be able to explain it to them in a different way.” A lot of AP teachers’ responsibility is helping the students understand the information or give the students a good starting point for the information.

A question that students might ask is, “What are the benefits and downsides of taking AP classes?” With AP classes you gain the opportunity of getting some college credits, some better knowledge going into college, and the chance to use what you learned in school in your everyday life or career. Mr. Leswing stated, “With all the topics it relates to their future whether it’s in the business world or it’s in their social life, or just their personal life.” However some drawbacks may be you may possibly get overwhelmed from the material as it is more advanced than normal high school material. You also have more responsibility in those classes like getting work done outside of class and getting assignments done on time as some classes don’t accept late work at all.

However, despite all this the teachers such as Mrs. Rosing said, “I have tailored the class to meet some of the deficits that I have identified in AP English in high school. ” Some teachers’ interests in their subjects inspired them to pursue teaching AP classes. Mr. Leswing stated, “That’s one of the reasons I wanted to teach it, because I had a psychology class in high school and really enjoyed it. The subject, the students that were in there, the teacher that was there. That’s why I wanted to be able to teach that.” So even though AP classes have a lot of responsibility or material, the people who teach it or know it the most believe if you want a challenge or believe you are ready for it, you should definitely take the class because the benefits outweigh the drawbacks.

Source for image – 

Mrs. Laken Rosing assists a student with analyzing the rhetoric of a letter from Abigail Adams in a letter to her son.

Profile: Hudson enjoys teaching film making, editing in Radio/BRoadcast classes

by Lilly Bowman/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Mr Jonathan Hudson is in the radio station talking into the mic and adjusting sound.

GC broadcasting teacher, Mr. Jonathan Hudson didn’t originally plan on being a teacher. So how/why is he one now? According to Mr. Hudson, “No, I did not originally want to become a teacher because I did not like school at all. They didn’t have Radio/TV. We had a newspaper but I was very censored in what I was able to write because I felt like I was doing real journalism talking about real world issues.”

Mr. Hudson stated of his time at the Christian school he attended, “Within a Christian school they don’t really want you to discuss things that are controversial. So nothing that I ever did really went out. I eventually made my own newspaper and printed it, but I got in trouble for it. So no, I never really wanted to be a teacher because I didn’t feel like I had the school experience. I didn’t have a me or a Mr. Holtzclaw or Mrs. Bernard. Or someone that kinda inspired or expected creativity. Everyone was very ‘by the book’.”

Mr. Hudson then pursued his own dreams. “So you know, I just wanted to work in this industry. I knew that and that’s what I did before becoming a teacher as a video editor and still do to this day. I’m doing freelance projects with a company named Precise take. I’m an assistant director. So I am getting the best of both worlds.”

He knew he wanted to be in the editing industry so when GC had an opening in the Radio/TV department, Mr. Hudson thought to give it a try. According to Mr. Hudson, “I feel very good about where I ended up being at department head and being fortunate enough to be on the leadership team of the school. It’s really really great. There are a lot of older teachers I feel like should be on it but I was asked to be on it to provide a different viewpoint. So I’m really honored to be doing that stuff.” 

Mr. Hudson also said, “I’ve run into some of my former teachers from Heritage Christian just here and there. Because I still live very close to Heritage, so I’ve run into them at restaurants and just that kinda thing. And I don’t have a bad kind of relationship with anyone. But I tell them I am a teacher and they actually think I’m lying or making a joke. They are like ‘what? You’re a teacher? That’s hilarious’ I’m like, ‘No, I’m actually teaching.’ They are like ‘You hated school,’  and yeah I kinda did. But I always said if I ever became a teacher I would be different. I would think differently, I know I don’t come from an educational background, I didn’t study in college to be a teacher, I just teach what I know and sometimes that comes across as I can be very tough. I can be very demanding but I am an authentic person. And I think kids kinda see that, that ‘hey I know he may be on us about certain things but at the same time he’s done it before he does it now to this day’ and I think a lot of kids respect that. And they like the projects and the environment here. So I think I would just say ‘Hey go with the flow, you know everything isn’t always as it appears to be’ 

Hudson continued, “I always wanted to be a video editor and that’s what I did for like four years; that was my full time job was just editing videos. And it gets really boring because you are just by yourself at a computer screen. So I just really wanted to be interacting with people. I think by nature I’m kind of a social person and I just enjoy meeting people and working with people.”

Everybody has a favorite topic they teach. Mr. Hudson stated, “My favorite thing is film making because I love storytelling. And you guys are doing some of that now, with your 15 shots and you know we are gonna watch your projects (Broadcast class) tomorrow. Just seeing how those turn out and how you guys are starting to think about angles. But ultimately I like telling stories, that’s the thing, I like taking an idea you have in your head and putting it on paper and then being able to tell it visually. I think it is a multi-step process but when you, you know, have your finished project. And I always tell you kids, ‘Save everything you’ve ever done’ because you are going to look back at some of your freshman projects and be like ‘God, that was terrible’  but then when you’re a senior you’ll be able to see how good you’ve become over the years. And so, I think here it’s very easy to quantify ‘Hey, this is where I was and this is where I’m at’ just by literally looking at your earliest projects and looking at some of your work when you are a senior.”

Having a job and a home life can be very difficult to most people, but to Mr. Hudson, he said, “It’s been a little bit tougher since I have had a daughter because you wanna be there for all the moments, you do. And that’s kinda the first thing I do when I get home. I try to do it, I change clothes so I don’t bring germs home and I wash my hands and my face and all that because babies grab everything. I go home and I pick up my daughter and I play with her and tell her I love her. And she is always happy to see me, so it’s like I feel like deep down even though she is a baby, I think she knows that I have to leave for work and I have to go make a living and provide. But then when I come home it’s like ‘Thank you, Dad, for doing what you do’. And that is not gonna last long, when she is your age she’s gonna be like ‘What’s up? Where is my money? Money I need for this and that.’ So I am just trying to enjoy this time while she is just happy to see me. It’s the most basic level of love and affection I feel like you get from a baby.”

 While he is happy at his job and at home, he is not alone on this journey in either place. One of Mr. Hudson’s former senior students, Mr. Max Holtzclaw, is now helping side by side with Mr. Hudson in this class. How does it work with two teachers in one classroom? Mr. Holtzclaw stated, “Mr. Hudson is a blast. I got to experience him as a teacher for my senior year of high school, and now I am working with him. It is a different transition but still fun, he is just the down-to-earth kind of guy. So I enjoy that aspect and he is a good mentor as well.” Mr. Holtzclaw also said, “I didn’t originally train to become a teacher, so a lot of things that I am learning now are things that he has kinda guided me along the way to do. So for example, when I was here we didn’t have the iPads especially so working with those have become a bit more of an experience for me. And so if I have any questions Mr. Hudson is always there to give me some guidance with it. So it’s really nice he is always there working side by side helps both of us too. It kinda splits the workload so we are both able to not be overwhelmed by it too.”

Hudson and Holtzclaw work together very well. Mr. Hudson has stated, “I mean, we have small classes and I think when there’s two of us, I know in the upcoming weeks I’ll be a lot more behind the scenes. I think a lot of that is by design, I don’t wanna get in his way, I don’t want him to feel like he has to teach the way I do, I want him to do things his own way. And that’s what our past teacher, (Mr. Bill McKenna) who was here before Mr. Holtzclaw, and I kinda decided ‘Hey, we think we want him to be the replacement.’ We don’t want him to be another version of what we do so I want him to be his own teacher and do his own thing. So I think to do that I need to step  out of the way.”

Hudson continued, “Now for example, it does help to have two of us  because I know that I can work with any student individually that’s struggling or just you know, helps to have two people look at projects because we look for different things. Given our background, yeah, I think it’s a class where two people are definitely needed, two people are definitely helpful. And with our after school responsibilities, we have so much we have to do that if one person had to try to do all the Nine Star productions and all the WRGF video stuff and all of our legal things we have to do would be a whole lot of work. That’s why we have two of us.”

The first day of school is difficult when you’re a student. But what about being a teacher? What’s the difference between the two? Mr. Hudson discussed his first day of teaching. “(It went) smoothly, I am not going to lie. I was confident that I could be a good teacher going into it. Alot of first year teachers doubt themselves, I feel like. And I feel like a lot of that comes from the stresses of being an education major and you hear these horror stories. I feel like when I started, I didn’t start here, I started at a different school. I was just kind of a blank slate, like no one really told me about teaching or how to teach or what to do. So I just did it the way that I wanted to so there was kind of a peace that I didn’t have to be like this robot teacher, I could just kind of come in and just do the things that I saw fit. So I think it went really well. My dad is a pastor and before I was a teacher I would spend a lot of time working with the youth group so I was always comfortable around teenagers. So it was actually a fairly easy transition for me.”

Mr. Hudson is known as big hearted and very friendly and outgoing. Students say they really enjoy the class not just by the extra help but from what they learn. Dugan Rowe, 10, stated, “Personally, I like when there is more than one person to help around. I enjoy mainly learning how to film and the new friends I made in the class make it better. I have learned many things but mainly to be more comfortable with being in front of the camera and how to film.”