Category Archives: feature

HOW THE WINTER WEATHER AFFECTED THE COUNTRY

by Jeremiah Edwards/Staff Writer

During the week of February 13-17, a winter storm came through North America. Places that usually don’t see the blanket of white, woke up to a little surprise on their doorstep. The winter weather stretched from the Rio Grande to Ohio. At first it was a treat, with posts on social media of people playing with the snow and exploring the vast pros and cons of the weather. Things took a turn when the weather worsened. Texas experienced many power outages leading to school closures and it is suspected that more than 70 people lost their lives. 

    Temperatures reached 8 degrees in Austin, Texas and -38 degrees in Hibbing, Minnesota, both temps breaking records in their respective states. State officials all over America recommended their citizens to stay home to avoid disasters on the roads. 10 people died due to crashes and poor road conditions. In 14 states, utilities called for a blackout which resulted from subzero temperatures. This left 300,00 residents of Oregon without power. 

Chicago had issues after 18 inches of snow fell in some areas of the city. Every hour almost 2 inches of snow fell, though areas like the O’Hare International Airport saw a lot less snow. This snowfall helped to tie the record for the longest stretch of days with snow since 1884, when records were kept of snowfalls. 

   Chicago wasn’t used to getting this much snow this quickly. Todd Kluber, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, stated, “We’ve had more snow in three weeks than we’d typically get in the entire winter.” 40.1 inches of snow had fallen throughout the three-week period, marking another record as one of the snowiest stretches. This total is about 5 inches more than the seasonal normal snowfall of 36.3 inches, Kluber said. https://www.chicagotribune.com/weather/ct-winter-storm-snowfall-totals–20210216-36pex67a5redhki3tnqfcdjh6q-story.html

Records after records kept getting broken by this winter storm. Over 73% of the lower 48 was blanketed with snow, the largest percentage since 2011, when NOAA began tracking show coverage. Texas was hit the hardest, due to its isolated electrical grid. The state had to rollout blackouts to conserve their energy.   Jessica Knofla, a Texan from Galveston, said of conditions in Galveston, “Basically, everyone who lives here had no warning and is stuck on a blacked-out island with no major stores open and no lights on the road. It’s absolutely infuriating.” https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/feb/16/texas-weather-snow-storm-latest-news-power-outages-deaths

12 million citizens of Texas were advised to boil their water before consumption. Kelsey Muñoz, an intensive care nurse in Dallas, stated from the link above, “Currently, I have power and I’m hoping I am not jinxing myself by saying that. However, for water I’ve had to gather snow and melt it. Never thought I had to do that in Texas.’ ” Four million people were without power throughout the week all across the country, 3.5 million were in Texas alone. People were even told to stop dripping their faucets to preserve water for hospitals and fire departments.

   The storm affected everyone differently. Some has a little bit of fun in the vast world of snow; others had very difficult conditions. One thing I think we’ve all learned from the storm: It’s time for summer. 

FOGGING THE ROOMS: HAS IT HELPED?

by Audrey Roberts/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Right before each showing of Almost Maine, played by the GCHS Drama Club, the auditorium seats were fogged.  Students brought in the machines and began to fog the auditorium, making sure to clean each and every seat to keep it clean enough for the viewers of the show.

Here at GCHS almost every room is fogged and it is known school-wide that this is due to Covid-19.  But how does this help?  What does it even do for the school and the people who work and learn here?

First, background information is needed.  GCHS decided to start fogging the rooms in the summer of 2020, to prepare for the 2020-2021 school year, says 

Mr. Nate Day, business manager and food services director of Greenfield-Central Schools, said the school received guidance from the Indiana State Health Department and the CDC about hygiene and cleaning surfaces to lower the chances of spreading the coronavirus.  With this in mind, the staff of GCHS chose to fog the rooms.

Mr. Day also said that the fogging of rooms and the wearing of masks has helped decrease the spread of other illnesses such as colds and the flu.

The question of how long rooms will be fogged is up in the air and already the school is discussing it.  Mr. Day said, “At this time we will continue our daily fogging protocol, but may adjust the frequency in the future.” Dr. Harold Olin, superintendent of Greenfield-Central Schools, also said that it was still unclear what the fogging precaution would look like next year.

For Madame Amanda Brown, the French teacher, fogging the rooms seems to be ruining things like door finishes and light switches.  She also mentioned that it doesn’t help with contact tracing, which is also a big move by the school to keep everyone safe.

Alex Smith, 11, had the student perspective of seeing multiple roooms that have been fogged. Smith said, “Yes, I do think fogging the room has helped because it has kept the germs away. But if it were my choice, I would not continue fogging because the fog feels weird on the desks.”

Madame also said that she was grateful the school had planned the fogging without letting it load the teachers with more work in their already packed schedule. 

Mr. Day said, “It takes 8-10 people to fog all of the buildings in the district.  They work overnight to complete the task 5 nights per week.”

While fogging the rooms has seemed to corrode many metal appliances and metal containers such as lockers, drawers, and cabinets, it hasn’t been all bad.  Not to mention, the teachers haven’t had to fog the rooms themselves, which gives them the time they need to continue grading and changing lessons to fit the school’s schedules.  

All in all, while the fogging is being evaluated for next school year, it has helped both in comfort for the students, teachers, and parents as well as keeping illnesses from spreading.

Drama Club PRESENTS ALMOST, MAINE IN LIVE PERFORMANCES

by Audrey Roberts/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Kaya Billman, 12, as Shelly, and Addy Martin, 9, as Deena, discuss dating and relationships in Almost, Maine.

The play Almost, Maine was performed by the GC drama club cast on January 28, 29, 30, and the 31.  But with Covid-19 interfering with normal events, how did the Drama club pull it off?

The director of the play, Mrs. Carolyn Voigt, picked a play that included eight scenes and prologue/interlogue/epilogue, and each scene involved different cast members.  This meant that every scene could stay socially distant from everyone but their scene partner(s).  With different members in each scene, everyone got a good role that also kept all the actors safe.

Second, the sound crew cleaned every mic, mic pack, and any other equipment before and after every use, said Paige Rutledge, 10.  They have always put mics on the cheeks and through hair, so doing the hair-positioned mics more often-due to the masks-was not a problem.

Overall, the members have done a great job of staying socially distanced.  When the director had to quarantine at home due to Covid-19 symptoms, the assistant director, Brynn Elliot, 11, took charge and kept the cast together.  She took on the extra leadership and was able to keep the practices going.

As for the actors, they did their part to stay socially distanced.  When the director was out, no one from the cast had to quarantine because they had been staying 6 ft. away from Mrs. Voigt.  With tactics like these, actors and crew members stayed safe, stayed smart, and made a great show.

Elliot said, “I know Mrs. Voigt has wanted to do Almost, Maine for a long time. This was just a great opportunity to do it.  The social distancing aspect of the show was one of the reasons we chose it, especially for contact tracing purposes.”  This is a great example of how the cast has worked to take a positive outlook on everything.

Towards the few weeks before show week, people were very cautious.  They couldn’t risk getting quarantined and missing their scenes.  Because of this, they worked to socially distance in their seats while watching the run-throughs during practice.

Of course, come show time, the small choir room and green room made it almost impossible to socially distance but by then everyone was either going to have it or not so people weren’t as worried.  It also helped build an even closer bond that might have been built sooner if not for Covid-19 and the six-feet rule.

Kaya Billman, 12, the president of Drama club, mentioned how good the play had turned out even under the circumstances, and what was even more impressive was the bond the club had made even through the differences and hardships, she said.

Christmas 2020: the year we all stayed home

By: Alex Smith/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: This Christmas in the year 2020 was the year we all stayed home.

    I think it is better to be a kid than an adult at Christmastime because my family’s Christmas traditions are warm, fun and pretty low-key: we decorate the Christmas tree, hang some Christmas lights (inside the house), and sing some truly off-key but hilarious renditions of Christmas carols (everyone else is off-key but my dad and me). Usually we do so two weeks before Christmas itself, but this year, it all happened just a few days beforehand – because of a pandemic.    

My family would normally go to my mom’s parents on Christmas Eve to open presents. But this year it’s going to be different. We will sit in their garage with the garage doors open (to prevent the spread of the Coronavirus) to open presents instead. After all the presents have been opened we will leave immediately. On Christmas Day, my three siblings and I would wake up and wait patiently in the hallway in our pajamas for our parents to get up before we can go downstairs to open our presents and our stockings. Later that night, we would normally go to my dad’s parents to open presents. We don’t know what that’s going to look like this year. My dad’s three brothers and their families would normally fly into Indiana for Christmas. That’s not happening this year, either. On my grandpa’s side of the family, we would normally have what we like to call the big Smith Family Christmas at the Hoosier Gym in Knightstown with all his brothers and their families. We aren’t doing that this year, either. This pandemic has changed our plans for Christmas this year drastically.


My family is strong in the Christian faith. So Christmas means a lot to us. Normally in September Realife, our church does a sermon series called “At the Movies” but because of the pandemic, that changed. On Sunday December 6, Realife kicked off a new sermon series called “Christmas at the Movies” that will uncover Biblical truths that are illustrated in clips from some of your favorite Christmas movies (that doesn’t include Die Hard) each week in December. This is the best time of the year to invite friends and family to church.

EXCHANGE STUDENTS compare notes on differences between gC, schools in home countries

by Iris Pinto Hidalgo

Photo Caption: Sara Cassitta

According to my experience and those of the other exchange students, I have been able to verify that the American and European schools have many differences, from schedules, exams, homework, to the very structure of the high school.

I think that what impressed me the most on my first day of class is how big the building is, besides that you constantly change classmates. I had never eaten at school before, although there are schools in Spain where it is also possible, but it was a new thing for me.

When the exam week came I was surprised that these were very different from those we do in Spain. We do one for each topic we see, they are all written, we can only write them with a pen and we do not have any kind of help as the notes of the agenda. We have to learn everything by heart.

Another thing that seemed very different to me was the schedule. Here I have 4 periods of an hour and a half. School starts at 8:30 and ends at 3:30, and we have a half-hour break. In Spain I have 6 periods of approximately 50 minutes: first I have 2, a twenty-minute break, another two and another 20-minute break, and the last two classes, ending at 2:30. We consider that we have classes in the morning and 2; 3-30 is the perfect time to eat.

Homework is not given as much importance as here. Teachers send it and it is part of the grade, but not much.

About the teachers in Spain. the truth is that there are all kinds, some are closer and friendlier, others are only interested in their work and do not even care about your learning. But there are some that I will never forget and that have helped me to be who I am today.

It is a difficult choice, but I think I like school more here. The way of learning is more fun and it makes class days go faster. In Spain students suffer a lot of stress due to the large number of exams we have and I think it is something that does not happen here, and of which I feel proud. 

Emily Schreiber, 11

She is an exchange student from Germany and she says,

“The thing that most impacted me on my first day here was that we do everything on the iPad. The other thing was the lunch break; we don’t have one on my school in Germany. My classes in Germany are only about 45 minutes long and we have 5 minutes breaks over classes and 20 minutes breaks after two classes. In this time you can go outside and walk or whatever you want to do.

Instead of here in my country we take the exams on paper and we have very long exams like 90 minutes long; we don’t have short tests.

My schedule changes all the days. Some days I can finish my lessons at 1p.m and the other at 4 p.m. I have 14 classes in total; not all the days are the same.

I only have homework in my important classes like math or German.

We don’t really have high school so we have 4 years of elementary school and then 8 years of the other school, 12 years of school in total.

My teachers in Germany are very close to their students they call us by name and even have inside jokes and stuff with some of them. we go on many class trips which brings us close together and because I’m always with the same group of people in my class the teacher has always the same class. they grade sometimes after sympathy which is not always fair but can also be a plus for some!

The building looks really different. I cannot see any similarities between them.

 I think I like the American school better, because here you can choose your classes depending on what you are interested in and you can use your iPad and also it’s kind of easier here than in Germany.” 

Sara Cassitta, 11

The exchange student from Italy has these thoughts about the differences on the high school:

“When I went to Greenfield-Central High School for the first time I was very lost because the school is so big and has a lot of classes. In Italy the schools are so different. They are smaller and they don’t have a cafeteria because in Italy we don’t have lunch at school and we have just one break in the middle of the morning. I go to school from 8:10 to 13:20 but I also go on Saturday. In Italy we have 5 years of high school and we have the same classmates for all 5 years, because the students don’t change the classes, but we have one class for all the subjects and the teachers change it. The teachers are more severe than here in US. Here you have one school with all the subjects and students can choose the subjects. In Italy, it’s so different, we can choose the school not the subjects because we have different type of schools, like one for science, one for languages, arts, economy and technical school. So the students go to school with other students who have the same interests as you.  The schedule in Italy changes every day, but every week is the same. In Italy the teachers don’t give us so much homework, other than math or subjects in which you need to practice, but they give us to study. To study I mean sit for hours to read, underline and repeat, because most of the tests are oral and the students have to go to the teacher’s desk and explain what they studied and it’s so difficult to achieve sufficiency. So the school is harder than here.  

Now with COVID-19 in Italy all high school students are online and they have to leave the camera on, they have to explain all the subjects with oral test because the teachers don’t trust written tests because the students can copy on the internet. 

Here teachers are closer and nicer, in Italy they only teach. So we don’t have more of a relationship than learn and teach.

In general I really like the school better here because it’s easier and funnier and in Italy we don’t have sports to play at school. We go to school just to study.”

The history of some major holiday traditions across the world

by Jeremiah Edwards/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Jeremiah Edwards, 9, stands by the decorated Christmas tree in front office at GCHS.

All around the world people celebrate different holidays close to the same time. For many Americans, it’s Christmas, but many don’t ever get to see or appreciate the ways other people celebrate their special winter holidays. 

    Christmas is celebrated on December 25. The holiday is founded on the birth of Jesus Christ, though even before Jesus was born, early Europeans would celebrate during the winter solstice. Yule was celebrated by the Norse in Scandinavia on December 21. On this day fathers and sons would bring home logs to burn; this activity could take up to 12 days. The Norse believed that with each spark of the fire a new pig or calf would be born the next year. In the early years of Christianity the birth of Jesus was not celebrated because we do not know the exact date he was born, as it was never mentioned in the Bible, though it became the universally accepted date. There are many different views on how this would come to be. December 25 was first identified as Jesus’s birthday by Sextus Julius Africanus in 221. 

       The eight day celebration, Hanukkah or Chanukah, commemorates the rededication of the second temple in Jerusalem. Legend says, at this temple the Jews had risen up against their Greek-Syrian oppressors in the Maccabean revolt. Jewish priest Mattahias and his five sons led a large scale rebellion against Antiochus and the Seleucid monarchy. When Mattahias died in 166 B.C, his son Judah took the helm. Within two years the Jews had successfully defeated the Syrians, pushing them out of Jerusalem. The rebellion relied on guerrilla warfare, which is when small groups of combatants engage in tactics to disarm and surprise their opponents.

Judah wanted his followers to cleanse the second temple, rebuild its altar and light its menorah. The gold candelabrum whose seven branches represented knowledge and creation were meant to burn every night. This story of Hanukkah doesn’t appear in the Torah because the events that inspired the holiday happened after it was written, though the story appears in the New Testament in which Jesus attends a “feast of dedication.” The celebration revolves around the kindling of a nine branched menorah, just like mentioned earlier. The shamash or helper is the ninth candle; it’s used to like the other eight over the course of the celebration. 

     Kwanzaa, unlike the other two holidays, was just created only 54 years ago, in 1966. The holiday was created by Maulana Karenga, a professor at California State University. The idea came after the Watts riots in Los Angeles, and the racial division that was apparent in LA. Karenga wanted a way to bring the African-American community together. After establishing an organization, US, he started to research African “first fruit” celebrations. Karenga combined the aspects of these many celebrations, a couple being those of the Ashanti people and those of the Zulu. 

The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase “matunda ya kwanza;” in Swahili it means “first fruits.” The celebration is seven nights long, and on each night a child lights one of the seven candles. Afterwards one of the seven principles or Nguzo Saba is discussed. Each is a value of African culture; these contribute to the strengthening of the African-American community. Along with the seven principles are the seven symbols, which all represent something of African culture. At the end of the celebration an African feast, called Karamu, is held on December 31. 

These holidays are a few of those celebrated all over the world. It’s important to shine lights on holidays that people might not hear or learn about. Christmas is a holiday many people at Greenfield-Central celebrate and a lot is already known about it, though it’s still important to look at the earlier history of Christmas. 

Holidays celebrated around the world

by Emily Oleksy/Staff Writer

Many people have diverse holiday celebrations, including the kinds of foods they eat at these times. It would be interesting to see what is customary for people to eat on that day and to explore the different foods that other people may not eat or experience. People around the world eat all kinds of different foods for the holidays.

The first place to discuss is Israel and they eat latkes. Latkes are fried potato pancakes that are cooked in oil. This is a very important part of the Hanukkah tradition for people, not only in Israel but also in the US and world-wide. This recognizes that the Second Temple kept the Menorah burning with oil for eight days. People might eat this meal for Hanukkah to celebrate.

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The next place is Italy and they eat panettone which has candied fruit, chocolate, raisins and nuts that it has in it. The panettone plays an important role during the holiday season in Northern Italy. It’s one of the most famous holiday sweets. The panettone might be served with several types of fish, prepared all different types of ways when they serve the panettone.

Next, England is where people have holiday pudding and the dishes goes by many different names. Whether you call it figgy pudding or plum pudding, there are so many different names for it. The pudding is the key desert to have for the holiday season which is made of suet, egg, molasses, spices and dried fruits. Brandy is poured over the pudding immediately before it is served, and then it is lit on fire.

The next stop is France where they have Bûche de Noël as their holiday désert. The La Bûche de Noël symbolically represents the Yule Log which is a log that was traditionally carried into the home sprinkled with wine and then burned on the day before they celebrated the holiday. The Bûche de Noël is often made from sponge cake and chocolate buttercream with a swirl and shaped into a log.

The last one is in Bulgaria and it the Koliva which is boiled wheat with sugar and walnuts and is often the first item to appear on the table for the holidays. It is sometimes served with honey, poppyseed, other grains, rice, beans, and dried fruit. The dish can be prepared in so many different ways and is often connected with the Orthodox traditions.

This article was written to explain some of the interesting things that people around the world eat for the holidays. Each food is different, according to where you are, all the different types of ingredients that people use, and why they have it for the holidays. Maybe this article can help people learn a little more about certain foods and places around the world.

in honor of veteran’s day: Ways We Can Honor Vets

By Audrey Roberts/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: A veteran and member of the Honor Guard salutes the flag during the Veteran’s Day ceremony from 2019. Also pictured are 2019 graduate Tyler Hornaday, and Mr. Jason Cary, principal. 

As another Veteran’s Day passes, many people showed their love and appreciation for the people who fought for their country by celebrating the veterans’ accomplishments through kind acts.  But November 11 is only one day out of 365.  Many veterans end up homeless, hungry, jobless, and alone.  They need help and not many get it.

There are many times the men and women who served our country are forgotten and not given the help they deserve and need after they come back from helping us.  Many people ignore their problems or don’t know how to help.

Luckily, the second option is fixable.  There are many people and organizations that will help our veterans with what they need most.  Organizations like American Legion, Veterans Families United, Vietnam Veterans of America, and many more are out there doing all they can to help their country’s fierce protectors.

The American Legion aims to help veterans and their families.  They raise money to support veterans and their families, for scholarships, and in times of need.  They accept ‘resolutions,’ which are ideas for change a member or group of members hopes to make to the organization to make it better.

The Veterans Families United is focused on helping veterans heal and recover from their service.  Many veterans and their families can’t afford help, but Veterans Families United is focused on getting them the help they need.  They raise funds to get the tools and extra help they need to support the veterans in need.

Likewise, the Vietnam Veterans of America organization seeks to help veterans heal and recover.  They also work hard to hold the government accountable for following or not following laws that deal with veterans’ health care and try to spread awareness and get people to acknowledge their veterans.  What really makes them stand out, however, is that they focus on changing the people’s mindset towards Vietnam veterans.  Because so many people disliked the Vietnam War, many blamed the US servicemen and women who served during this time.  To fix this, the Vietnam Veterans of America works towards convincing people to acknowledge that their Vietnam veterans are not to blame.

While these organizations and many more are working hard to help the veterans, there are still ways to help veterans with smaller acts, though that doesn’t make their impact small.  There are many stories about someone taking the time out of their carefree lives to help a veteran in need.

For instance, a man on a trip to Maryland saw a man on the street with a sign that said, “I am a homeless veteran please help,” while he was driving.  He pulled over the car and gave this veteran a twenty dollar bill.  The veteran said he was moved by his kindness and extremely grateful (“Kindness Starts With One”).

Willis Bryant, a U.S. Air Force veteran, was living under a bridge in Dothan, Alabama.  When he turned to a homeless shelter, he was told about the Priority Veteran program which is possible through a grant from the Department of Veteran Affairs.  When he got in touch, they helped him get medical help and found him an apartment to live in.

John Traffanstedt is a Vietnam veteran who is a part of Mustang American Legion Post 353 in Mustang, Oklahoma.  He owns a van which he uses to transport himself and the rest of the Mustang Legion Post 353 to other veterans’ funerals.  They work to honor other veterans in the hope that their courage and lives are not forgotten.

Some ways people can help veterans in their area range from getting together with some friends to build a house for a homeless veteran to just stopping to say “thank you for your service” to another veteran.  These small acts may seem inconsequential to the person doing them, but they really will mean a lot to the veterans.

The American Legion

Veterans Families United

Vietnam Veterans of America

A list of Veteran Support Organizations

Random Acts of Kindness: Helping a Homeless Veteran

Veteran’s Stories

Something Good:Mustang Veteran Uses Van To Honor Fellow Vets

For more ways to help veterans:

Profile: Amador emphasizes communication, culture in Spanish class

By Alex Smith/Staff Writer

Photo caption: Señora Erika Amador talks to Destinee Roberts, 11, about Spanish during G1.

Señora Erika Amador has some very important goals for her World Language Spanish class. She said, “Of course I would love for my kids to be able to communicate well in Spanish with native speakers and others. However, my number one goal for my kids as a Spanish teacher is for them to have a more open mind toward people and cultures different from their own.”

    Abby Morgan, 10, who has been taking Spanish since eighth grade, discussed what Señora Amador does to help her learn. She said, “Amador gives us plenty of notes and time to study when it’s time for a test or quiz. I never feel unprepared for anything.” Mason Poole, 11, who has been taking Spanish for three years, also talked about what Señora Amador does to help him learn. He said, “Amador helps make sure we understand before we move on.”

    There have been many moments along her teaching career that have stood out. Amador, Spanish teacher, who has been teaching Spanish for 17 years, commented on what makes teaching worth it. She said, “When I see one of my kids’ faces light up because they understand a concept, when one of my kids tells me that they understand something that a native speaker said, or when one of my kids contacts me years after graduating to share how he/she is currently using Spanish that makes it worth all of the stresses that come along with teaching.”

    Poole commented on what Amador does to make Spanish class fun. He said, “Amador does activities that keep you engaged and learning.” Amador talked about the funniest thing to happen while teaching. She said, “Several years back, a student mispronounced a word and misread its meaning. I can’t share what he said because it was inappropriate but it was also extremely funny. It was an honest mistake on the kid’s part that still has me laughing today.” Morgan also discussed what Amador does to make Spanish class fun. She said, “We always play lots of games in Amador’s class. It personally makes me want to study Spanish more when it’s fun.”

    Amador commented on her favorite lesson to do with the kids. She said, “Teaching about the Dominican Republic is one of my favorite lessons to share with kids. Because I lived there for 2 ½ years it brings back a lot of great memories. The kids also enjoy learning about the culture and hearing about my personal experiences in the country.” She also talked about what her favorite activity to do with the kids is. She said, “One of my favorite activities to do with kids are conversation circles, where we practice a conversation entirely in Spanish, changing partners each time we finish the conversation. I love hearing the students speak Spanish and watching their confidence grow as the activity progresses.” 

    Morgan said that her favorite thing about Spanish with Amador is that she gives them lots of resources (such as games, Quizlets, Kahoots, etc.) to make sure that they know the material. Poole discussed what he enjoys about Spanish with Amador. He said, “My favorite thing about Spanish with Amador is her fun touch she adds to everything.” Amador’s favorite aspect of teaching Spanish is that she loves getting to share her love for the Spanish language and Hispanic culture with her kids and seeing them get as excited about it as she is. Helping students succeed and find their own passion is also very rewarding to her. 

    Amador commented on some of the challenges of teaching Spanish. She said, “That is a difficult question. I guess it would have to be when my kids don’t take advantage of the time that I give them to complete work in class.” Poole said that his least favorite thing about Spanish with Amador is that sometimes they can get sidetracked talking. Morgan discussed her least favorite thing about Spanish with Amador. She said, “My least favorite thing about Spanish in Amador’s class would probably be the homework. I don’t think anyone really likes doing it, but it has to be done.” 

    Amador discussed her own mentor who inspired her. She said, “Señora K, Mrs. Patricia Knasinski, was one of my many mentors. Sra. K was my high school Spanish teacher for all four years. In class she was always very passionate about teaching and found new and exciting ways to get her students speaking Spanish without fear of embarrassment when we made mistakes.”

    Poole said he has gained meaningful things about the Spanish language. He said, “I have learned a lot about the culture and its roots in different places.” Morgan also discussed what she has acquired from the Spanish language. She said, “I’ve learned lots of things about the Spanish language. I think it’s fairly easy to learn and understand if you study it and actually want to succeed in speaking it.” 

    Amador discussed how she keeps the kids’ attention. She said, “I try to keep the kids engaged by using a variety of instructional strategies, including games and real-life examples of the concepts we are studying.” 

    Amador also commented on how she balanced her work and home life. She said, “I love my kids at school but my family comes first. When I am not at school, I try to put school work away and focus on my home life. Then if I have some ‘free time’ at home I sneak in a little school work here and there until I hear ‘Mommy!’ ” Amador has two sons. Her oldest son is 10 years old and his name is Benji; her youngest son is 5 years old and his name is Lucas.

    Morgan told a story she will remember about Amador. She said, “A memorable story about Amador would probably be when she lived in the Dominican Republic and danced with the famous baseball player, she didn’t know who he was but everyone around her did.” Amador couldn’t isolate only one memorable moment in her teaching experience. She said, “There are way too many for me to pick just one.”  

Photo caption: Señora Erika Amador talks to Destinee Roberts, 11, about Spanish during G1.

Señora Erika Amador has some very important goals for her World Language Spanish class. She said, “Of course I would love for my kids to be able to communicate well in Spanish with native speakers and others. However, my number one goal for my kids as a Spanish teacher is for them to have a more open mind toward people and cultures different from their own.”

    Abby Morgan, 10, who has been taking Spanish since eighth grade, discussed what Señora Amador does to help her learn. She said, “Amador gives us plenty of notes and time to study when it’s time for a test or quiz. I never feel unprepared for anything.” Mason Poole, 11, who has been taking Spanish for three years, also talked about what Señora Amador does to help him learn. He said, “Amador helps make sure we understand before we move on.”

    There have been many moments along her teaching career that have stood out. Amador, Spanish teacher, who has been teaching Spanish for 17 years, commented on what makes teaching worth it. She said, “When I see one of my kids’ faces light up because they understand a concept, when one of my kids tells me that they understand something that a native speaker said, or when one of my kids contacts me years after graduating to share how he/she is currently using Spanish that makes it worth all of the stresses that come along with teaching.”

    Poole commented on what Amador does to make Spanish class fun. He said, “Amador does activities that keep you engaged and learning.” Amador talked about the funniest thing to happen while teaching. She said, “Several years back, a student mispronounced a word and misread its meaning. I can’t share what he said because it was inappropriate but it was also extremely funny. It was an honest mistake on the kid’s part that still has me laughing today.” Morgan also discussed what Amador does to make Spanish class fun. She said, “We always play lots of games in Amador’s class. It personally makes me want to study Spanish more when it’s fun.”

    Amador commented on her favorite lesson to do with the kids. She said, “Teaching about the Dominican Republic is one of my favorite lessons to share with kids. Because I lived there for 2 ½ years it brings back a lot of great memories. The kids also enjoy learning about the culture and hearing about my personal experiences in the country.” She also talked about what her favorite activity to do with the kids is. She said, “One of my favorite activities to do with kids are conversation circles, where we practice a conversation entirely in Spanish, changing partners each time we finish the conversation. I love hearing the students speak Spanish and watching their confidence grow as the activity progresses.” 

    Morgan said that her favorite thing about Spanish with Amador is that she gives them lots of resources (such as games, Quizlets, Kahoots, etc.) to make sure that they know the material. Poole discussed what he enjoys about Spanish with Amador. He said, “My favorite thing about Spanish with Amador is her fun touch she adds to everything.” Amador’s favorite aspect of teaching Spanish is that she loves getting to share her love for the Spanish language and Hispanic culture with her kids and seeing them get as excited about it as she is. Helping students succeed and find their own passion is also very rewarding to her. 

    Amador commented on some of the challenges of teaching Spanish. She said, “That is a difficult question. I guess it would have to be when my kids don’t take advantage of the time that I give them to complete work in class.” Poole said that his least favorite thing about Spanish with Amador is that sometimes they can get sidetracked talking. Morgan discussed her least favorite thing about Spanish with Amador. She said, “My least favorite thing about Spanish in Amador’s class would probably be the homework. I don’t think anyone really likes doing it, but it has to be done.” 

    Amador discussed her own mentor who inspired her. She said, “Señora K, Mrs. Patricia Knasinski, was one of my many mentors. Sra. K was my high school Spanish teacher for all four years. In class she was always very passionate about teaching and found new and exciting ways to get her students speaking Spanish without fear of embarrassment when we made mistakes.”

    Poole said he has gained meaningful things about the Spanish language. He said, “I have learned a lot about the culture and its roots in different places.” Morgan also discussed what she has acquired from the Spanish language. She said, “I’ve learned lots of things about the Spanish language. I think it’s fairly easy to learn and understand if you study it and actually want to succeed in speaking it.” 

    Amador discussed how she keeps the kids’ attention. She said, “I try to keep the kids engaged by using a variety of instructional strategies, including games and real-life examples of the concepts we are studying.” 

    Amador also commented on how she balanced her work and home life. She said, “I love my kids at school but my family comes first. When I am not at school, I try to put school work away and focus on my home life. Then if I have some ‘free time’ at home I sneak in a little school work here and there until I hear ‘Mommy!’ ” Amador has two sons. Her oldest son is 10 years old and his name is Benji; her youngest son is 5 years old and his name is Lucas.

    Morgan told a story she will remember about Amador. She said, “A memorable story about Amador would probably be when she lived in the Dominican Republic and danced with the famous baseball player, she didn’t know who he was but everyone around her did.” Amador couldn’t isolate only one memorable moment in her teaching experience. She said, “There are way too many for me to pick just one.”  

Poole said that he will remember Amador’s love for her kids and for her students the most. Morgan discussed what she will remember the most about Amador. She said, “I’ll probably remember Amador’s stories the most. I feel like her always starting the class off with a story of something that has happened to her is a good way to start my morning.” As for what she wants the kids to remember about her, Amador said, “It’s not about me. It’s about them. Each one of my kids is an incredible, unique individual who has worth and a purpose. There is no one else that can be the people who they are meant to be. That is what I want them to remember.”

Poole said that he will remember Amador’s love for her kids and for her students the most. Morgan discussed what she will remember the most about Amador. She said, “I’ll probably remember Amador’s stories the most. I feel like her always starting the class off with a story of something that has happened to her is a good way to start my morning.” As for what she wants the kids to remember about her, Amador said, “It’s not about me. It’s about them. Each one of my kids is an incredible, unique individual who has worth and a purpose. There is no one else that can be the people who they are meant to be. That is what I want them to remember.”

The true story behind ‘The Conjuring’ movie

by Kalei Griffin/Staff Writer

Have you ever seen the movie The Conjuring? If so, you’d be surprised to find out that the movie depicts what actually once happened. Demonologists and paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren were the helping hands behind this terrifying and true story. The victims of this terrifying case were those of the Perron family. 

In January of 1971, the Perron family moved into a 14-room farmhouse in Harrisville, Rhode Island. Right away, each member of the family: Carolyn (mother), Roger (father), and their five daughters, started to experience small but strange things occurring: brooms going missing, hearing weird sounds in the kitchen when no one was present, finding small piles of dirt in the middle of the kitchen floor right after she would get done sweeping, etc. Though Carolyn experienced weird occurrences, her daughters would actually see spirits with their own eyes. Once every member of the family started to notice the phenomena going on, Carolyn decided to research the history of the home. Carolyn discovered that the home had been in the same family for eight generations, in which half of them experienced multiple mysterious and horrible deaths within the home and/or in close proximity with the home. She also found that many of the children had drowned in a nearby creek, one was murdered, and a few of them hanged themselves in the attic. The most commonly seen spirit was a woman who would roam the house mainly at night according to Andrea Perron, the oldest daughter. According to the “True Story of the Perron Family and Enfield Haunting,” ‘whoever the spirit was, she perceived herself to be the mistress of the house and she resented the competition my mother posed for that position,’ said Andrea Perron

(https://allthatsinteresting.com/true-story-of-the-conjuring-perron-family-enfield-haunting). The woman being seen by the family was a woman named Bathsheba Sherman.

Bathsheba lived on the property in the mid 1800s. She was rumored to have been a Satanist and practiced witchcraft. She was also accused of being involved in the death of a neighbor’s child, but she was never charged. She soon passed away and was buried nearby. The occurrences eventually got to the point where they felt the need to reach out for help, which is where Ed and Lorainne Warren come in. Both Ed and Lorraine conducted many investigations and participated in many seances in the farmhouse. During one of the seances, Carolyn Perron, the mother, became possessed in which she began “speaking in tongues and levitating in her chair”, said Lorraine Warren (https://allthatsinteresting.com/true-story-of-the-conjuring-perron-family-enfield-haunting).  After this particular seance, the Perron family, particularly Roger, kicked both Ed and Lorraine out of their home and banned them from ever coming back. Roger was concerned for his wife’s safety at this point. After the seance, all of the occurrences and spiritual sightings began to die down but they didn’t completely end until the Perron family eventually moved in 1980.

Though the supernatural occurrences with the Perron family came to an end, the traumatic situation never seemed to die down. It will always be remembered by those who truly believe.

Sources:

https://www.historyvshollywood.com/reelfaces/conjuring.php