Category Archives: News

The latest and greatest and most hard hitting of information.

FCCLA back in action

by Connor Griffith/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Huy Nguyen, 9, and Grace Hurst, 10, cater for teachers at parent-teacher conferences.

Since school started FCCLA has been working hard. The group has been having Monday meetings almost every week, and has had some activities. FCCLA is the Family Career and Community Leaders of America. It is a group in the FACS department run by Mrs. Janelle Keusch. “My favorite thing about FCCLA is the people, and the environment it creates. We are like one big family,” stated Izabelle Mosma, 10, FCCLA President. Olivia Strickland, 9, a new member, said, “My favorite thing is the people.” 

The group went to the State Fairgrounds to volunteer at the Dairy Barn. They helped serve people, and make sandwiches for customers. “I am really wanting to do more community service this year,” Monsma said when asked about what she would like to do. The group recently did catering for the teachers at Parent Teacher Conferences. They work very hard at FCCLA to be the best versions of themselves.

They are a completely student-run organization which is oversee by the advisor Mrs. Keusch. They are run by a group of officers. Each year a new officer team is voted on, and is ultimately chosen by the advisor. This year the officer team consists of 8 officers: Monsma, 10, Reese Hearn, 12,  Lauren Haney, 11, Kiera Hope, 10,  Connor Griffith, 10, Vaughn Wallacer, 11, Cassius Day, 10, Mallory Schnecker, 12, and Americas Thompson, 11.

The group is always accepting new people in the club at all times. “I was a part of FCCLA last year and it was fun, therefore I decided to return this year,” Haney stated. FCCLA offers so many opportunities for everyone; they present scholarships and hold state and national competitions. Last year they attended a state conference and Grace Hurst(10)  (FCCLA Member) qualified for the national conference in San Diego, California. It was a great time for everyone who went, members said. 

For many this group is a fun, welcoming place. “FCCLA has always been a fun and relaxing club that I enjoy,” said Haney. “FCCLA means family, because I have my closest friends with me and my favorite teachers. That is where I want to be when I’m having a hard time,” Monsma said. 

Photo 1- Kiera Hope, 10,  Kiera makes a fruit Tart at FCCLA Fall Conference.

Photo 2 – Reese Cooksey, 9, Reese makes a fruit Tart at FCCLA Fall Conference.

GC freshmen choose their favorite fall food

By Audrey Marguet/Staff Writer

The cold is coming back, the leaves are slowly turning red, and autumn is coming. And what better way to spend this season than in the kitchen?

The freshmen of GC took a survey to present to you the most loved fall food this year.

And the winner is…

The pumpkin pie!

First known as “tourte of pumpkin”, its creation dates back to 1651, when the famous French chef Francois Pierre la Varenne included it in his famous cookbook Le Vrai Cuisinier François

(The True French Cook). Later, in 1670, the recipe for pumpkin pie began to appear in English cookbooks and sound more familiar. Some spices were added to the original recipe as well as sometimes apples or grapes.

Currently, it has become one of the most popular desserts during the fall season and is really appreciated by most Americans, or at least by most of the GC freshmen.

Here is a recipe that you can use to prepare this dessert at home and treat your family :

Ingredients :

  • Homemade Pie Dough
  • egg wash: 1 large egg beaten with 1 Tablespoon milk
  • one 15oz can (about 2 cups; 450g) pumpkin puree
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 and 1/4 cups (250g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon (8g) cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground or freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/8 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 cup (240ml) heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) milk 

Instructions :

  • Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C).
  • Roll out the chilled pie crust: Remove 1 disc of pie dough from the refrigerator. On a lightly floured work surface, roll the dough out into a 12-inch circle. Make sure to turn the dough about a quarter turn after every few rolls. Carefully place the dough into a 9-inch deep pie dish. Tuck it in with your fingers, making sure it’s tightly pressed into the pie dish. Fold any dough overhang back into the dish to form a thick rim around the edges. Crimp the edges with a fork or flute the edges with your fingers. Brush edges lightly with egg wash mixture.
  • Par-bake the crust: Line the pie crust with parchment paper. Crunching up the parchment paper is helpful so that you can easily shape it into the crust. Fill with pie weights or dried beans. (Note that you will need at least 2 standard sets of pie weights to fit.) Make sure the weights/beans are evenly distributed around the pie dish. Par-bake the crust for 10 minutes. Carefully remove the parchment paper/pie weights. Prick the bottom of the crust all over with a fork to create steam vents and return crust (without weights) to the oven for 7-8 more minutes or until the bottom is just starting to brown. 
  • Make the pumpkin pie filling: Whisk the pumpkin, 3 eggs, and brown sugar together until combined. Add the cornstarch, salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, pepper, heavy cream, and milk. Vigorously whisk until everything is combined.
  • Pour pumpkin pie filling into the warm crust. Only fill the crust about 3/4 of the way up. (If using a deep dish pie dish as instructed, you should only have a little filling leftover. Use extra to make mini pies with leftover pie dough scraps if you’d like.) Bake the pie until the center is almost set, about 55-60 minutes give or take. A small part of the center will be wobbly – that’s ok. After 25 minutes of baking, be sure to cover the edges of the crust with aluminum foil or use a pie crust shield to prevent the edges from getting too brown. Check for doneness at minute 50, and then 55, and then 60, etc.
  • Once done, transfer the pie to a wire rack and let it cool completely for at least 3 hours before garnishing and serving.
  • Decorate with pie crust leaves . Serve pie with whipped cream if desired.
  • Cover leftovers tightly and store in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

This is a pumpkin pie that I made with the recipe in this story. It was delicious and really easy to make.

(Recipe found on https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/the-great-pumpkin-pie-recipe/ )

Profile: Booth re-purposes Holzhausen’s items, puts “unique twist” on her crafts

By Esther Bell/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Here is Ms. Holzhausen’s booth, the Little Green Pineapple, at Red Ranch Shoppes in Fortville.

Four years ago, on October 1st, 2018, GCHS English 9 teacher Jennifer Holzhausen opened a booth for arts and crafts.“I enjoy selling things,” she says. “But related to that, I like finding things that people are looking for, and are excited to find.” Her booth demonstrates her passion. “I enjoy making something new out of something that was old,” says Holzhausen, “and taking materials that potentially were donated or discarded and making them beautiful in a completely different way.” 

For Holzhausen the crafts began when she was young. “I used to do a lot of cross stitching and I made crafts with my mom and I made things in Girl Scouts and in art classes,” she says, “I had an art scholarship because I took a lot of art classes in high school.” She spent a lot of time doing crafts with her dad. “We sort of blended our talents together to create some cheese plates and cake plates or domes that I had found and so it started with that, honestly,” she explains.

    Arts and crafts have always come easily to Holzhausen. “I’ve always been a creative person, and I’ve always had an artistic side,” she says, “I just haven’t had a whole lot of opportunities to explore that; but I really think that I get my creativity and my artistic skills from my dad. He’s very hands on, and he’s a builder and a maker, and I think that’s where I get it.”

    A lot of her inspiration comes from simple tutorials. “I did watch a lot of YouTube videos to kind of get a sense of how these things are built, and how I can do it better,” says Holzhausen, “I took what I learned from those and I made it more complicated, but I feel like I made it more special and unique, and added my own twist to everything.”

Featured here are some of the brooms Ms. Holzhausen is working on for Halloween.

    This can be seen with the broomsticks Holzhausen is making for Halloween. So far, she has made 52. The brooms are made from curtain rods and a variety of other repurposed items. Each of them have been given names, some simply based on the personality of the broomstick, and others after well-known people, both real and fiction. According to Ms. Holzhausen, “Some are named after literary and movie or TV witches or villains (Samantha, Tabitha, Winifred, Evanora, Hermione, Cruella).” Each of them are unique in specific ways, including the types of belts and handles each of them have, that give them personality. “I’m loving these broomsticks,” Holzhausen says, smiling, “I have had more fun doing this than probably anything else in the last twenty-five years. I’m super passionate about it. I’ve really enjoyed the creative outlet.” 

    Holzhausen already has future plans for her business. “Eventually I hope to make this my retirement job,” she explains, “and I wanted to start early so that I could have something that was already well established by the time I do retire, and I wasn’t starting from ground zero. This month has been the best month I’ve ever had in terms of my sales and so it gives me a lot of hope and encouragement that this can be a really decent income in the next nine years.”

There are challenges that also come with having a booth, though. “The challenges for me are that I am only one person,” says Holzhausen, “and so a lot of what I do requires some heavy lifting and moving of furniture. It’s difficult for me because I’m muscling a lot of that myself.” She goes on to say that even with that, it’s far more rewarding than challenging.

As for her teaching, Holzhausen says that having a side business complements it more than anything. “It gives me another creative outlet,” she says “I think that it helps me think outside the box a little bit more, and it helps me to inspire my students to be able to do things that are not necessarily on the college track. If students want to start their own businesses or pursue being an entrepreneur, that is something that I can help them with.”

Holzhausen continues with advice for someone who wants to start their own booth. “I would say start it as soon as possible,” she says, “and be prepared to learn quickly what sells and what doesn’t sell, and the most important thing is to find the right price point for the people that you’re trying to target.” For her, this means understanding what her customers want and using that to create new things. “For the most part,” Holzhausen says, “I think my inspiration comes from my customers and what they’re looking for, which is something different, something they’ve never seen before.”

Daylight Saving time: should we save it?

By: Janna Hopper/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Daylight Saving Time has become a debated topic in the past years. But until something changes, make sure that all your clocks are set to the same time when this day rolls around. Photo by: Janna Hopper

When we “spring forward” with Daylight Saving Time each year, that night is full of groans and complaints; that Monday is exhausting and tedious. And when “fall back” comes around we celebrate our regained hour of sleep. But what is Daylight Saving Time for? Are the health effects worth it?

The story we are used to relating to Daylight Saving Time is that it was meant to give extra daylight time to farmers. However, this explanation makes very little sense. Scott Jacobs, the GCHS Agricultural Science and Business Teacher, remarks “Most of the farmers I know don’t care one way or the other about daylight savings time. They realize there will be a certain amount of daylight hours to complete their work. If they have to get up earlier or work later, they will just work until the job is completed.” Changing the hours on a clock would not affect their schedule in the slightest.

So why do we bother with this strange tradition? Is it more of a matter of keeping time zones consistent for better trade and communication? Yet not every state in the U.S. participates. Should we be trying to break out of this habit or is it not worth the trouble?

A healthy sleep schedule is a fragile thing, with benefits we often take for granted. Becky Robertson, the GCHS health assistant, says that there are many benefits that come with consistent sleep. She talks about how having a regular sleep schedule improves your mood, helps keep your blood pressure and sugar healthy, and also helps your heart. She mentions that “The single most effective way to start and stick to a bedtime routine is to make a commitment to yourself and your health.” Effective sleep schedules work best when you don’t use screens in the hour before bed and when you stay consistent with the times you are going to bed and getting up. Daylight saving time forces us to disregard the latter.

Daylight saving time throws off our sleep schedules all at once. This has affects far greater than just making you more tired. While Robertson admits to not being an expert on sleep, she  talks about the negative effects this schedule change can have on us. The first and most noticeable impact is that it throws off our internal clock. “When we aren’t sleeping well, it affects our whole bodies.  Most of us get grumpy, we don’t eat as well, we don’t exercise as much, and can even experience increased anxiety and/or depression” she says. She even mentions how research has found that this sudden change increases the risk for heart attack.

So indeed, this turns out to be quite the serious issue with the broad impact it has on our health and wellbeing. While Jen True from the GCHS attendance office hasn’t noticed a particular increase in tardies in the days following the time change, it is possible that we have managed to turn this into an unhealthy habit; automatically changing our clocks and just trying to work through the side effects. In the opinions of Robertson and many others, we should stop practicing Daylight Saving Time. It is no longer properly serving its original purpose and it is negatively impacting the health of those who practice it.

So as fall blows into full swing, don’t forget that tricky matter of Daylight Saving Time creeping our way once again. Perhaps it’s finally time to get rid of this outdated and unhealthy practice. Just make sure that all of us in the state agree on it; the excuse “I’m not practicing Daylight Saving Time” might not go over so well if you start showing up an hour late.

Profile: Mosser helps as teacher, exchange student adviser

by Trot Scholl/Staff Writer

Ms. Jordan Mosser is one of the foreign language teachers in the high school. Many students at Greenfield think she is a great teacher. Student Bryson Pratt, 12,  says, “She teaches very well. She goes in depth about her work she assigns. Every time I have a question about the assignment she answers it very well so I can understand.”

At first she did not plan on being a teacher. She said, “Originally I did not want to be a teacher but I told myself if I was going to study German then I would either be in teaching or in business.” Ms. Mosser was very close to switching her major to elementary education but decided that working with kids around high school age fit her better. She was always pushed by her old German teacher at her high school. “My German teacher kept pushing me to learn and keep using German, but she never pushed me to be a German teacher.”

 While yes at first Ms. Mosser didn’t want to be a teacher, this doesn’t mean she doesn’t enjoy teaching. She stated, “I like helping students learn German and other things that aren’t German and other things about the world so you can be young and functioning adults in the world. At the end of the day, I know most of you won’t use German after highschool but I like to see my students challenge themselves.” 

Ms. Mosser also helps with the foreign exchange students. “I think it’s fun to see how they react to American culture and how they react to American schools. I think it’s fun to work with kids from other places because they have other perspectives on the world,” Mosser stated.

Ms. Mosser is very fluent in German and can help students learn German very easily with her help. Pratt said, “Since she is so fluent, she can teach it very well to where I can understand the work.” She helps as many of her students to understand the subject as she can and explains her assignments very well.

Ms. Mosser is a very good teacher with helping other students, helping the foreign exchange students and many other things. Ms. Mosser, who wasn’t planning on being a teacher in the first place, is a very helpful instructor at the high school.

New FACS Teacher, GC Grad brings new ideas to classroom

by Justice Hyde/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Ms. Mikayla Bowman works in her FACS classroom. Photo by Justice Hyde

GCHS’s newest FACS teacher Mikayla Bowman is a former GC graduate who just became a certified teacher at the start of this school year. When she was a student at GC she took every FACS class she could, and in fact she currently works with many of her old FACS teachers. Ms. Bowman has only been teaching for a month, but she is already being described as “fantastic” by fellow FACS teacher Mrs. Sandy Powell. But there is much more to Ms. Bowman than what meets the eye.

Ms. Bowman’s mom was a teacher, so she spent much of her childhood in classrooms, and has always been enthusiastic about teaching. “I always wanted to help around the classroom or grade papers,” Bowman stated. Mrs. Bowman coaches the GCHS dance team, and has been coaching since before she became a teacher, so she’s always been active in GC schools. 

Ms. Bowman graduated from GCHS in 2017. When asked what made her decide to come back to GC schools as a teacher, Bowman asked, “Why wouldn’t a teacher want to teach at the same school they graduated from?” She described how amazing it is to be working in the exact classroom she fell in love with FACS in. 

Ms. Bowman puts amazing amounts of effort into her job even having only been here for a few weeks. Mrs. Powell, a fellow FACS teacher, complimented her by describing her with terms like passionate, creative, and intelligent. She is well liked by her students, with many naming her their favorite teacher even having only known her for a few weeks. “When some of my students were asked what class they looked forward to the most, many of them said my FACS class,” Ms. Bowman said.

Bowman is already known throughout the student body for her fun and energetic way of teaching. She always manages to keep class interesting and fun, while still making sure students are able to learn all that they need to be successful in her class. 

Guidance welcomes two new counselors

by Aidan Bow/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Mrs. Sarah Graham is the new director of counseling.

This year at GCHS we have two new counselors. Both of them have skills that are helpful to our school; they are a resource for students that need help whether it’s with schedules or mental health.

 Mrs. Sarah Graham,  GCHS director of counseling, is a new counselor at GCHS. Before joining the GCHS counseling team she worked at Warsaw Community High School in Indiana, as the counseling director of the school.

She grew up in Wabash, Indiana and graduated from Northfield High School. Later in her life she went to Wesleyan University, where she got her bachelor’s degree in social work and criminal justice. She also has two masters in community mental health and school counseling.

 Mrs. Graham is new to the team but she is already hard at work making our school a better place. About the amount stress she started with in the job, she stated,“The first couple weeks were stressful but it’s smooth now.”

Once they got through most of the students schedules, her stress shrunk significantly and she was able to settle down for the new school year. When asked about Mrs. Graham Mrs. Sherri Foster, a GCHS counselor stated, “Mrs Graham has a lot of new ideas to bring to our community and school.”

Mrs. Sheleatha Aldridge works at her desk.

This is Mrs. Sheleatha Aldridge’s first year here. She used to work at Muncie Southside Middle School; she worked there for 2 years. She grew up in Springport, IN. Mrs. Aldridge graduated from Blue River Valley Jr/Sr High School. After graduating she went to Purdue University where she got her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Civil Engineering. For a brief period she was a structural engineer before she went to IUPUI to get her masters degree in Counselor Education and an Ed in Counseling degree.

She is the mother of three children. When asked if setting up high school schedules was stressful she responded with, “It was stressful as the high school has way more classes than the middle school where I used to work.” She stated afterwards however she likes the challenge it poses.

Mrs. Foster also commented on how Mrs. Aldridge is handling things, stating, “She is good with middle schoolers but is learning to deal with high schoolers. Mrs. Aldridge has a great attitude.”

“I’m excited to have them on the team,” Mrs. Foster said.

Profile: Cheerleading Coach Carey builds “legacy of Cougar cheerleading”

By Della Hedge/ Staff Writer

Photo Caption: These are the 2022-2023 cheerleaders, ready to start the new season.

Motivating, character building, challenging, these are the words Coach Christy Carey gave to describe her coaching style. She has been cheering for years; she cheered at her high school and middle school.  She also has cheered at regional, national and world levels. After that she cheered at the collegiate level at Purdue University. This is her fourth school for coaching and she is still an active cheerleader today. Safe to say she is pretty qualified. 

Cheering made her who she is; she loves teaching the next generation of young cheerleaders. She loves challenging young student athletes. “Greenfield Central seemed like a special place to grow the legacy of Cougar cheerleading,” she said. Coach Carey wants to take the cheer program into the better light. She said, “Cheerleaders are often given a bad reputation even though it might not be deserved.” She wants to build a community; one of her goals is to get the cheerleaders into the community around us while building a community in the cheer program. 

“Coaches I have had in the past are my driving force to be the best coach I can be,” Coach Carey strives everyday to be the best coach she can be. “I think I was surprised at how welcomed I was, how excited the girls were and the parents and staff”.  After the last basketball season everything was up in the air for the cheerleading program and having someone who came in and completely flipped it was new and exciting not only for the cheerleaders but the parents too. This being Coach Carey’s 4th school she was ready to take on the Cougar cheerleading program.  And every cheerleader or parent was ready for the ride. 

“I love my girls so much,” Carey stated. When asked what she loves the most about her cheerleaders she says “I loved how hard we worked for 3 months with a rocky start and everyone buying into my vision and my mission”. She was hired right before summer, not much time to plan or organize everything. In cheerleading you need time to prepare and plan and she wasn’t given much time at all and was hired by herself. She did get one coach hired just in time for summer, Coach Logan. 

Coach Logan Gruell is a third generation Greenfield grad, and cheered all throughout high school. “Coach Carey and I have similar coaching styles, which makes us such a great team. I am really enjoying getting to learn from Coach Carey with the experience that she has.” Coach Logan and Coach Carey have very similar goals for the team. Which makes the cheerleading team run even smoother. 

Coach Hanna Collins is the head JV coach, she was also a cheerleader at GCHS. She was offered a position from Coach Logan. “I really wanted to be back involved with cheer at the school I graduated from.” This is her first coaching high school level cheerleaders. She also had noticed some changes then vs now. “The only differences I have noticed are the closeness of the team mates. It seems like everyone is friends with someone from the opposite like JV is friends with some on varsity or vice versa”. Not only is this a great thing, but it also gives the JV team someone to look up to. Coach Collins will do great things not only for the program as a whole but progress the JV team in any way she can. 

Coach Carey is not only influential on cheerleaders but coaches too. “Given that I had not had previous experience coaching high school aged kids I wanted to take on her style and build my own style off of hers” says JV head coach Collins. Coach Carey alongside her other coaches has really made a space for cheerleaders to really succeed, “I think she has already changed the program for the better, she’s given us a cheer family where we all feel at home” sophomore and 2nd year varsity member Maddi Bowman states. 

The cheerleading program has gone through so much change in the past years but Coach Carey is hopefully a great and last change for a while. Coach Carey has really made a space where cheerleaders can just be cheerleaders. That is a something that not only was needed but long awaited and just in time for the seniors last year. 

Exchange students compare, contrast US, Home Countries

by Audrey Marguet/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Ms. Jordan Mosser speaks with Ainara Flores Garcia, one of the exchange students. Photo by Audrey Marguet

“Wow, that was my dream,” said Rosalia Golen, one of the eight exchange students of Greenfield Central who left their country, family and friends to come here and live the famous American dream for the next 9 months. Coming to a new country could be exciting but sometimes the adaptation is very hard. Making new friends, speaking another language and working for school is not that easy, from what the students said.

Golen is 17 years old and comes from Poland. She arrived in the US July 26, only 9 days before the beginning of school. For the moment, she really loves life in the United States. “You can choose your classes, it’s amazing!” she said. Schools in the USA are really different from the others, you can choose your classes,have to change rooms between every block…  “In Poland, every year we have the same classes with the same people.” Another different thing here is sport and the other different clubs in school. Almost every student is engaged in one of them, and most of the parents are very invested in it. In European schools, it’s pretty rare to find such a varied list of clubs and sports teams in one school.

Going on an exchange year is a big decision to take, for the student who’ll leave their home country to live in a place where they don’t know anybody but also for the parents, who won’t be able to see their child for 10 months. However this experience is exciting. It could also be very hard, family, friends, house, everything they left home, most of the students are going to miss it very much. 

“I think the hardest thing is not having public transportation,” Ms Jordan Mosser, GC’s German teacher who also works with the international students, said, “they have to be a lot more reliant on their host parent, or friends.” European students are habituated to be able to go almost everywhere by bus or trains. Coming here is a big change for them because you have to drive to get around; there’s no public transportation. 

“It usually takes about a month for them to get fully comfortable,” Ms. Mosser said.

Cultural differences are pretty big between Europe and America, in school but not just school. From what the students say, everything here is bigger: schools, roads, cities,… For them, the thing they’re probably going to miss the most is food. Living 10 months without eating the food that they ate during all their life can be difficult.

But when you have a dream, nothing can stop you. Three years ago, Lorenzo Pedroni, from Italy, came with his family to visit the USA for one month, and then, came the idea of this exchange year. Now he’s here in Greenfield, and more than happy to be. He’s even going to try out for the basketball team.

Student Profile: senior tech head reminisces over moments in drama department

By Megan Bundy/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Addie Coombs, 12, paints a wall for You Can’t Take It With You.

Addie Coombs, 12, has been the tech head of the paint crew for the drama department since her sophomore year, given the position suddenly after the cancellation of GC Drama’s 2020 spring musical, Footloose, during her freshman year. Despite the abrupt change, Coombs said she isn’t complaining; being tech head has been super fun for her. 

When Coombs started high school in August 2019, she said she didn’t know what to expect at first. “I don’t remember everything, but I think I was way more nervous for high school than I was excited.” Coombs said. She also remarks on why she decided to join theater her freshman year. “I really wanted to be involved in something, since I heard so many teachers tell me to get involved in things or else my high school career would be really boring.”

One of Coombs’ best friends since the 7th grade, Abby Morgan, 12, is also involved in the drama department as part of the paint crew to help paint the set in productions. When asked her best moments in theater with Coombs, she said, “One of my best moments with Addie in theater would be my first show, Cheaper by the Dozen. Our paint head at the time would always put us together on jobs and we’d always laugh together.” Morgan also says that she’s learned a lot of things from Coombs, including how to be more kind to herself and others around her. “She’s always been the nicest person I’ve ever known, and I’d like to think some of it has rubbed off on me.”

Carolyn Voigt, an English teacher and drama director at GC, has worked with Coombs during shows as well. Voigt describes her as passionate and a kind leader, having the ability to lead a group without being authoritative during shows. “Addie meets deadlines, and communicates and delegates tasks to her team well,” Voigt mentioned while commenting on Coombs’ leadership qualities. Voigt mentioned several reasons why Coombs was okayed to become a tech head for the program. “Addie always asked what she could do to help the production, even if it was extra work. She showed initiative, and she got along well with others. She was/is dependable.”

For her last season of shows in the drama department, Coombs is looking forward to many things with her crew. “I’ve always loved hanging out with my crew and spending hours upon hours with them, especially during tech weeks when we don’t have much to do other than talk with each other and enjoy each other’s company. So I’m really looking forward to the final few times I get to do that!”

Now as a senior, Coombs said, “Being a senior is so incredibly weird.  Obviously it’s really nice because I know the rounds of the school, teachers aren’t as cautious/strict, things like that. One of the main things I’ve noticed is that the fear and self consciousness you feel when you start out as an underclassman is completely gone.” When asked what advice Coombs would give to younger students, she said “My advice is to try and make friends! Don’t stick to just one or two people, try and branch out and really throw yourself out there. Being in high school is so much more fun when you have people by your side who you enjoy talking to.”