Profile: brown details day in life of french teacher

By Alex Smith/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Madame Brown talks to Mya Wilcher, 10, about what she did over Fall Break. Photo by Alex Smith

    Teaching can be a stressful job. Madame Amanda Brown, French teacher, who has been teaching French for 18 years, talked about what makes teaching worth it. She said, “My students make it worth it. Getting to know them. Getting to see that moment where they ‘get it.’ Getting to experience them making connections between topics and subjects. Getting to laugh with them.” 

    Shaun Hughes, 10, who just started taking French this year, talked about what Madame Brown does to help him learn. He said, “She helps me learn by taking the time to individually help me get better.” Christopher O’Connor, 12, who has been taking French for the last four years, also talked about what Madame Brown does to help him learn. He said, “Madame helps me learn by understanding that I have a lot in life to focus on alongside school, so she gives me leniency.” 

Brown discussed what she wants students to learn in French class and what her number one goal is. She said, “I hope that kids leave my class with a bit wider perspective and understanding of the world as a whole.”

O’Connor commented on what Brown does to make French class fun. He said, “Madame brings her energy to class every day, and always tries to keep us engaged. That’s the most fun thing, is that it’s never boring.” Brown talked about the funniest thing to happen while teaching. She said, “I can’t think of a specific moment, but there are so many inside jokes with the classes. When you have the same group of kids for four years, it’s impossible to narrow the funny and ridiculous down.” Hughes also talked about what Brown does to make French class fun. He said, “Madame makes things fun for class by telling us funny stories about some of the different things we learn in class and by just creating an overall pleasant mood in class.”

Hughes said that his favorite thing about French with Brown is that he gets to learn so much about different cultures and different countries. O’Connor discussed his favorite thing about French with Brown. He said, “My favorite thing about French with Madame is the vibe of the classroom. All of us have been in that class with her for four years, so it’s a comfortable environment.” Brown’s favorite thing about teaching French is that she loves discussing cultural differences with her students. 

Brown talked about her least favorite thing about teaching French. She said, “I asked my French 4 class because I really couldn’t think of anything. Chris O’Connor’s contribution is ‘When someone asks you how to do something or does it wrong and you just warned someone to be careful about making that mistake or JUST taught it. That doesn’t go over well.’ Tara Powell’s,12,  contribution (in loving sarcasm) is ‘Having Chris as a student.’“ O’Connor said that his least favorite thing about French with Brown is that she’s always on them if they don’t give their best effort, that it can be frustrating, but he gets it. Hughes talked about his least favorite thing about French with Brown. He said, “I don’t really have a least favorite thing in French since I like the culture and mostly everything about it.” 

O’Connor talked about what he has learned about the French language. He said, “French is a beautiful language, but it’s a pain in the butt half the time.” Hughes also talked about what he has learned about the French language. He said, “The French language is quite difficult but like I said I get to enjoy learning about the different cultures and more about the French culture.” 

Hughes told a memorable story about Brown. He said, “Madame tells us lots of memorable stories so I don’t know which one to do but it seems like she has so much fun teaching French to students.” O’Connor also told a memorable story about Brown. He said, “Madame would let me sleep in her classroom before school when I was tired from early morning football workouts. She gave me bean bags to sleep on so I was comfortable. That was when I knew she was different.” Brown talked about a memorable moment in her teaching experience. She said, “ I teach Le Petit Prince (The Little Prince) second semester of French 4. Everytime I teach Chapter 21….it’s the most memorable experience of the 4 years I have with each group.” 

Brown talked about how she keeps the kids engaged. She said, “I try to be as weird, obnoxious, and goofy as my students are (and in some cases, more). Being overly dramatic, using funny voices, telling stories … all part of my game plan.” 

Hughes talked about what he will remember the most about Brown. He said, “I will always remember her smile, her kindness, and her unique personality.” O’Connor commented on what he is going to miss about Brown when he graduates. He said, “I’ll miss how much she cares about me and all of her other students.” Brown talked about what she wants the kids to remember about her. She said, “I hope they remember me as someone who is always rooting for them.” 

Brown talked about who her mentor is. She said, “I don’t really have a mentor, per se, but I refer to Mrs. Stoeffler, Mrs. Anderson, and Mrs. Berger-Harmon as who I want to be when I grow up.”

Brown talked about her favorite lesson to do with the kids. She said, “The ‘DR MRS P VANDERTRAMP’ story, regarding French verbs, for example,  Devenir – To Become, Revenir – To Come Back, and Monter – To Climb.  (This is my favorite) because I get to draw (poorly), I get to be overly dramatic (always), and I get to talk about soccer and food and the circle of life.”

She also talked about what her favorite activity to do with the kids is. She said, “My favorite activity to do is teach the ‘Avoir Rap’.” The “Avoir Rap” is how Madame Brown teaches her students the verb “Avoir” or “To Have” in French class. Brown said about the “Avoir Rap”: “We usually have a lot of fun with it. It’s catchy. It has a lot of call and response elements to it. And it’s one of those things the students tend to remember. Plus, I get to be a TOUCH obnoxious which always makes me have fun.”

Profile: Commissiong positively influences students in JAG

by Kalei Griffin/Staff Writer

JAG (Jobs for America’s Graduates) director and leader Mrs Cherie Commissiong has shared and taught in many different environments throughout her career. She first began to teach at IU Bloomington. After working years with college students, she decided that she would be “more valuable” working with high school students, preparing them for “what’s next” after graduation. She takes her teaching career very seriously and puts the maximum amount of effort into everything she does. So what makes Mrs. Commissiong stand out, and how does she influence so many people?

Commissiong graduated from Ben Davis High School. She furthered her education by attending Indiana University(IU). She earned both her undergraduate and graduate degrees. She has always been intrigued by teaching and career readiness. She then began to teach at IU Bloomington for several years. During that time, she realized that she and her skills, along with her knowledge, would better help high school students rather than college students. So, in 2018, she became a high school teacher. 

Within the two years Commissiong has been teaching here at Greenfield-Central, students have grown a strong liking for her and some students have grown a special bond with her that is indescribable. “I am able to connect with Mrs. C in a way that I can’t connect with any other teacher at GC. She is such a wonderful soul and her compassion is outstanding,” says Gracie VanderMeulen, 12. 

“We are able to have ‘real conversations’ about their futures- the fears, expectations, plans, etc,” says Commissiong. Mrs. Commissiong has the ability and opportunity to connect with her students in a meaningful way. Her students are one of her top main priorities and she takes pride in making sure her students are successful and healthy, mentally and physically she said.

Mrs. Commissiong’s goal is to better students, prepare them for the real world, and to leave an impact on her students and she does just that. “Before I started attending the JAG program, I had no clue what I wanted to do after high school nor did I know how to do really anything in the real world. I’ve only been in her class for about a month and I have learned more than I have ever learned,” says Jada Conn, 11. 

Mrs. Commissiong has come a long way and has made her time here valuable. Commissiong has many goals she plans to achieve that will all contribute to one main goal.  “It is my mission to make sure my students are confident about their skills and knowledge to navigate along their journey after graduation,” she says.

Profile: students enjoy listening to fields’ “classroom stories,” passion for science

by Andrew Love/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Fields’ class works outside.

Biology teacher Ms. Rebecca Fields has been involved with teaching and extracurricular activities since she began her career here at Greenfield Central. Fields has been known to help out with things like SLA, JSA, Genetics and Engineering, and Robotics club. So who is this “laid back” teacher as former GC student Preston Evans called her, and how has she impacted the school and students?

Teaching for 15 years at our school, Fields has gotten to know the students and staff better than most and it shows as she is very well respected. Students enjoy listening to her “classroom stories, as it makes class interesting and whatever is going on that day just comes out,” says John Stuckey, 10.  

Before getting her masters degree in Biology she worked in business. After getting her masters degree in biology going from Purdue to IU, she transferred to a teaching program and became a registered teacher about a year later. She enjoys the challenge of being a teacher and seeing all of the students’ different perspectives. “I enjoy trying to make unmotivated students motivated,” says Mrs. Fields. Students like that she is relatable and easy to talk to. 

“I always enjoyed how passionate she was about any type of science I talked to her about,” says Evans. Fields says, “I took every single science class I was offered in high school.”  

John Stuckey, 10, says, “Whether we were talking about biology, money, life, whatever it was she was knowledgeable about and could help you out.”

 Students enjoy how her classes are not just “boring homework” as John Stuckey says it, and more about “real biology hands on lab,” as Fields states. Even for the students that were not totally into science, she is usually still able to talk and relate to them about sports or other activities after helping outside of school, for example being an assistant swim coach and a driver’s ed driver.

Whether you had Fields or not, she is a veteran teacher here at GC and wants the best for each student and staff member. “Once I leave I want to know that I helped people here from all ages have a better time during the school year,” she said.

Profile: Mosser helps as teacher, exchange student adviser

by Trot Scholl/Staff Writer

Ms. Jordan Mosser is one of the foreign language teachers in the high school. Many students at Greenfield think she is a great teacher. Student Bryson Pratt, 12,  says, “She teaches very well. She goes in depth about her work she assigns. Every time I have a question about the assignment she answers it very well so I can understand.”

At first she did not plan on being a teacher. She said, “Originally I did not want to be a teacher but I told myself if I was going to study German then I would either be in teaching or in business.” Ms. Mosser was very close to switching her major to elementary education but decided that working with kids around high school age fit her better. She was always pushed by her old German teacher at her high school. “My German teacher kept pushing me to learn and keep using German, but she never pushed me to be a German teacher.”

 While yes at first Ms. Mosser didn’t want to be a teacher, this doesn’t mean she doesn’t enjoy teaching. She stated, “I like helping students learn German and other things that aren’t German and other things about the world so you can be young and functioning adults in the world. At the end of the day, I know most of you won’t use German after highschool but I like to see my students challenge themselves.” 

Ms. Mosser also helps with the foreign exchange students. “I think it’s fun to see how they react to American culture and how they react to American schools. I think it’s fun to work with kids from other places because they have other perspectives on the world,” Mosser stated.

Ms. Mosser is very fluent in German and can help students learn German very easily with her help. Pratt said, “Since she is so fluent, she can teach it very well to where I can understand the work.” She helps as many of her students to understand the subject as she can and explains her assignments very well.

Ms. Mosser is a very good teacher with helping other students, helping the foreign exchange students and many other things. Ms. Mosser, who wasn’t planning on being a teacher in the first place, is a very helpful instructor at the high school.

New FACS Teacher, GC Grad brings new ideas to classroom

by Justice Hyde/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Ms. Mikayla Bowman works in her FACS classroom. Photo by Justice Hyde

GCHS’s newest FACS teacher Mikayla Bowman is a former GC graduate who just became a certified teacher at the start of this school year. When she was a student at GC she took every FACS class she could, and in fact she currently works with many of her old FACS teachers. Ms. Bowman has only been teaching for a month, but she is already being described as “fantastic” by fellow FACS teacher Mrs. Sandy Powell. But there is much more to Ms. Bowman than what meets the eye.

Ms. Bowman’s mom was a teacher, so she spent much of her childhood in classrooms, and has always been enthusiastic about teaching. “I always wanted to help around the classroom or grade papers,” Bowman stated. Mrs. Bowman coaches the GCHS dance team, and has been coaching since before she became a teacher, so she’s always been active in GC schools. 

Ms. Bowman graduated from GCHS in 2017. When asked what made her decide to come back to GC schools as a teacher, Bowman asked, “Why wouldn’t a teacher want to teach at the same school they graduated from?” She described how amazing it is to be working in the exact classroom she fell in love with FACS in. 

Ms. Bowman puts amazing amounts of effort into her job even having only been here for a few weeks. Mrs. Powell, a fellow FACS teacher, complimented her by describing her with terms like passionate, creative, and intelligent. She is well liked by her students, with many naming her their favorite teacher even having only known her for a few weeks. “When some of my students were asked what class they looked forward to the most, many of them said my FACS class,” Ms. Bowman said.

Bowman is already known throughout the student body for her fun and energetic way of teaching. She always manages to keep class interesting and fun, while still making sure students are able to learn all that they need to be successful in her class. 

Guidance welcomes two new counselors

by Aidan Bow/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Mrs. Sarah Graham is the new director of counseling.

This year at GCHS we have two new counselors. Both of them have skills that are helpful to our school; they are a resource for students that need help whether it’s with schedules or mental health.

 Mrs. Sarah Graham,  GCHS director of counseling, is a new counselor at GCHS. Before joining the GCHS counseling team she worked at Warsaw Community High School in Indiana, as the counseling director of the school.

She grew up in Wabash, Indiana and graduated from Northfield High School. Later in her life she went to Wesleyan University, where she got her bachelor’s degree in social work and criminal justice. She also has two masters in community mental health and school counseling.

 Mrs. Graham is new to the team but she is already hard at work making our school a better place. About the amount stress she started with in the job, she stated,“The first couple weeks were stressful but it’s smooth now.”

Once they got through most of the students schedules, her stress shrunk significantly and she was able to settle down for the new school year. When asked about Mrs. Graham Mrs. Sherri Foster, a GCHS counselor stated, “Mrs Graham has a lot of new ideas to bring to our community and school.”

Mrs. Sheleatha Aldridge works at her desk.

This is Mrs. Sheleatha Aldridge’s first year here. She used to work at Muncie Southside Middle School; she worked there for 2 years. She grew up in Springport, IN. Mrs. Aldridge graduated from Blue River Valley Jr/Sr High School. After graduating she went to Purdue University where she got her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Civil Engineering. For a brief period she was a structural engineer before she went to IUPUI to get her masters degree in Counselor Education and an Ed in Counseling degree.

She is the mother of three children. When asked if setting up high school schedules was stressful she responded with, “It was stressful as the high school has way more classes than the middle school where I used to work.” She stated afterwards however she likes the challenge it poses.

Mrs. Foster also commented on how Mrs. Aldridge is handling things, stating, “She is good with middle schoolers but is learning to deal with high schoolers. Mrs. Aldridge has a great attitude.”

“I’m excited to have them on the team,” Mrs. Foster said.

Profile: Cheerleading Coach Carey builds “legacy of Cougar cheerleading”

By Della Hedge/ Staff Writer

Photo Caption: These are the 2022-2023 cheerleaders, ready to start the new season.

Motivating, character building, challenging, these are the words Coach Christy Carey gave to describe her coaching style. She has been cheering for years; she cheered at her high school and middle school.  She also has cheered at regional, national and world levels. After that she cheered at the collegiate level at Purdue University. This is her fourth school for coaching and she is still an active cheerleader today. Safe to say she is pretty qualified. 

Cheering made her who she is; she loves teaching the next generation of young cheerleaders. She loves challenging young student athletes. “Greenfield Central seemed like a special place to grow the legacy of Cougar cheerleading,” she said. Coach Carey wants to take the cheer program into the better light. She said, “Cheerleaders are often given a bad reputation even though it might not be deserved.” She wants to build a community; one of her goals is to get the cheerleaders into the community around us while building a community in the cheer program. 

“Coaches I have had in the past are my driving force to be the best coach I can be,” Coach Carey strives everyday to be the best coach she can be. “I think I was surprised at how welcomed I was, how excited the girls were and the parents and staff”.  After the last basketball season everything was up in the air for the cheerleading program and having someone who came in and completely flipped it was new and exciting not only for the cheerleaders but the parents too. This being Coach Carey’s 4th school she was ready to take on the Cougar cheerleading program.  And every cheerleader or parent was ready for the ride. 

“I love my girls so much,” Carey stated. When asked what she loves the most about her cheerleaders she says “I loved how hard we worked for 3 months with a rocky start and everyone buying into my vision and my mission”. She was hired right before summer, not much time to plan or organize everything. In cheerleading you need time to prepare and plan and she wasn’t given much time at all and was hired by herself. She did get one coach hired just in time for summer, Coach Logan. 

Coach Logan Gruell is a third generation Greenfield grad, and cheered all throughout high school. “Coach Carey and I have similar coaching styles, which makes us such a great team. I am really enjoying getting to learn from Coach Carey with the experience that she has.” Coach Logan and Coach Carey have very similar goals for the team. Which makes the cheerleading team run even smoother. 

Coach Hanna Collins is the head JV coach, she was also a cheerleader at GCHS. She was offered a position from Coach Logan. “I really wanted to be back involved with cheer at the school I graduated from.” This is her first coaching high school level cheerleaders. She also had noticed some changes then vs now. “The only differences I have noticed are the closeness of the team mates. It seems like everyone is friends with someone from the opposite like JV is friends with some on varsity or vice versa”. Not only is this a great thing, but it also gives the JV team someone to look up to. Coach Collins will do great things not only for the program as a whole but progress the JV team in any way she can. 

Coach Carey is not only influential on cheerleaders but coaches too. “Given that I had not had previous experience coaching high school aged kids I wanted to take on her style and build my own style off of hers” says JV head coach Collins. Coach Carey alongside her other coaches has really made a space for cheerleaders to really succeed, “I think she has already changed the program for the better, she’s given us a cheer family where we all feel at home” sophomore and 2nd year varsity member Maddi Bowman states. 

The cheerleading program has gone through so much change in the past years but Coach Carey is hopefully a great and last change for a while. Coach Carey has really made a space where cheerleaders can just be cheerleaders. That is a something that not only was needed but long awaited and just in time for the seniors last year. 

Exchange students compare, contrast US, Home Countries

by Audrey Marguet/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Ms. Jordan Mosser speaks with Ainara Flores Garcia, one of the exchange students. Photo by Audrey Marguet

“Wow, that was my dream,” said Rosalia Golen, one of the eight exchange students of Greenfield Central who left their country, family and friends to come here and live the famous American dream for the next 9 months. Coming to a new country could be exciting but sometimes the adaptation is very hard. Making new friends, speaking another language and working for school is not that easy, from what the students said.

Golen is 17 years old and comes from Poland. She arrived in the US July 26, only 9 days before the beginning of school. For the moment, she really loves life in the United States. “You can choose your classes, it’s amazing!” she said. Schools in the USA are really different from the others, you can choose your classes,have to change rooms between every block…  “In Poland, every year we have the same classes with the same people.” Another different thing here is sport and the other different clubs in school. Almost every student is engaged in one of them, and most of the parents are very invested in it. In European schools, it’s pretty rare to find such a varied list of clubs and sports teams in one school.

Going on an exchange year is a big decision to take, for the student who’ll leave their home country to live in a place where they don’t know anybody but also for the parents, who won’t be able to see their child for 10 months. However this experience is exciting. It could also be very hard, family, friends, house, everything they left home, most of the students are going to miss it very much. 

“I think the hardest thing is not having public transportation,” Ms Jordan Mosser, GC’s German teacher who also works with the international students, said, “they have to be a lot more reliant on their host parent, or friends.” European students are habituated to be able to go almost everywhere by bus or trains. Coming here is a big change for them because you have to drive to get around; there’s no public transportation. 

“It usually takes about a month for them to get fully comfortable,” Ms. Mosser said.

Cultural differences are pretty big between Europe and America, in school but not just school. From what the students say, everything here is bigger: schools, roads, cities,… For them, the thing they’re probably going to miss the most is food. Living 10 months without eating the food that they ate during all their life can be difficult.

But when you have a dream, nothing can stop you. Three years ago, Lorenzo Pedroni, from Italy, came with his family to visit the USA for one month, and then, came the idea of this exchange year. Now he’s here in Greenfield, and more than happy to be. He’s even going to try out for the basketball team.

Student Profile: senior tech head reminisces over moments in drama department

By Megan Bundy/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Addie Coombs, 12, paints a wall for You Can’t Take It With You.

Addie Coombs, 12, has been the tech head of the paint crew for the drama department since her sophomore year, given the position suddenly after the cancellation of GC Drama’s 2020 spring musical, Footloose, during her freshman year. Despite the abrupt change, Coombs said she isn’t complaining; being tech head has been super fun for her. 

When Coombs started high school in August 2019, she said she didn’t know what to expect at first. “I don’t remember everything, but I think I was way more nervous for high school than I was excited.” Coombs said. She also remarks on why she decided to join theater her freshman year. “I really wanted to be involved in something, since I heard so many teachers tell me to get involved in things or else my high school career would be really boring.”

One of Coombs’ best friends since the 7th grade, Abby Morgan, 12, is also involved in the drama department as part of the paint crew to help paint the set in productions. When asked her best moments in theater with Coombs, she said, “One of my best moments with Addie in theater would be my first show, Cheaper by the Dozen. Our paint head at the time would always put us together on jobs and we’d always laugh together.” Morgan also says that she’s learned a lot of things from Coombs, including how to be more kind to herself and others around her. “She’s always been the nicest person I’ve ever known, and I’d like to think some of it has rubbed off on me.”

Carolyn Voigt, an English teacher and drama director at GC, has worked with Coombs during shows as well. Voigt describes her as passionate and a kind leader, having the ability to lead a group without being authoritative during shows. “Addie meets deadlines, and communicates and delegates tasks to her team well,” Voigt mentioned while commenting on Coombs’ leadership qualities. Voigt mentioned several reasons why Coombs was okayed to become a tech head for the program. “Addie always asked what she could do to help the production, even if it was extra work. She showed initiative, and she got along well with others. She was/is dependable.”

For her last season of shows in the drama department, Coombs is looking forward to many things with her crew. “I’ve always loved hanging out with my crew and spending hours upon hours with them, especially during tech weeks when we don’t have much to do other than talk with each other and enjoy each other’s company. So I’m really looking forward to the final few times I get to do that!”

Now as a senior, Coombs said, “Being a senior is so incredibly weird.  Obviously it’s really nice because I know the rounds of the school, teachers aren’t as cautious/strict, things like that. One of the main things I’ve noticed is that the fear and self consciousness you feel when you start out as an underclassman is completely gone.” When asked what advice Coombs would give to younger students, she said “My advice is to try and make friends! Don’t stick to just one or two people, try and branch out and really throw yourself out there. Being in high school is so much more fun when you have people by your side who you enjoy talking to.”

GC men’s tennis team prepares for county

by Ryley O’Brian/Staff Writer

Photo caption: Junior CJ Michalek prepares to serve against a Scecina player.

The GC men’s tennis team is nearing the halfway point of their season. There are three meets left before county and nine meets before sectionals. They have already made a mark on the season with an 8-1 record.

Greenfield Central junior Caden Robertson has helped the team push to achieve this record. “I think we are doing very well,” Robertson stated. “We are performing above expectations.” The tennis team’s record last year was 13-4. With an 8-1 record this season they are looking to beat last year’s record and maybe even win county. They have even beaten multiple teams that they fell to last season.

Delta High School was a team that beat the tennis players last year. The Cougars suffered a heartbreaking 4-1 defeat with only one of the doubles’ teams winning. This year the tables have turned. Greenfield Central powered through to beat Delta for the first time in GC men’s tennis History. The score was 3-2 with a singles sweep. Junior Chris Long was one of these singles’ players. Long accredits this success to the coaching staff. “Over the off-season we have all worked hard and gotten better thanks to Coach (Michael) Turpin’s advice and Coach Lawhorn’s great coaching,” Long stated. 

The Cougars have already beaten multiple conference rivals including New Palestine and New Castle. Greenfield recently upset New Castle. The victory was 4-1 with every match being hard fought. Another conference rival, New Palestine, has recently fallen to the Cougars. The Cougars won against New Palestine 3-2. This pushes the tennis team’s record to be undefeated by conference rivals this season. The next conference rival the tennis team faces will be Mt. Vernon.

Junior CJ Michalek is undefeated going into this last week before county. “It took hours of very hard work to come this far,” Michalek responded. “All the effort I put into getting better has really helped me this season.”

Robertson’s goals this season are to win sectionals and county. This seems to be a common goal among GC mens tennis players. Long said, “I hope we can win county or sectionals this year.” Long thinks this is a very real possibility because they are having the best season he has been a part of according to him. Robertson believes Mt. Vernon or New Palestine may be the toughest opponents in the county tournament. With an 8-1 record all seems possible to these Cougars. 

Profile: A closer look at GC’s lunch ladies

by Madi Burns/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Lunch ladies prepare lunch for students and staff at GC.

Lunch ladies and cafeteria workers, who normally get lesser recognition, have stories to tell, just like teachers and staff. An example would be Ali Stine, dishroom worker and former cashier, who has been a part of Greenfield Central for 8 years. 

Ali Stine, a mother of 3 and dishroom worker, cares a lot about GC students. “I love the interaction with the kids. Probably way too much. I’m in the dish-room now, and I so miss it. I miss the interaction with my kids. I call you guys [students] my kids,” Stine said.

When Stine was young, she wanted to live in Florida, become an accountant, and drive a really nice car. However, when she took finite math, she realized that maybe accounting wasn’t for her. So she came to Greenfield Central, and became a cashier for the lunch line. 

Stine is inspired by being kind, and making a difference. “I want to be nice, like I want to make people happy.” She went on to say, “When I first started here, I was a cashier, and my goal was to get kids to talk. I wanted everyone to say hi. I started with maybe 5 kids saying it, and by the end of the year, I had 50 kids that said hi. I just wanted to make a difference.” 

Lunch ladies prepare lunch for students and staff at GC.

Stine shared the best advice she’d ever received. “There’s a difference between being kind and showing kindness. You have to know the difference. You have to truly be kind to people.” And her advice to younger generations here at GC and everywhere else, is to just be present. 

One thing Stine wishes people knew about her is that, “I care about everybody. I care too much.” A favorite of her personality is pretty much the same. “I’m always happy. I always smile. I’m always happy. Again, I care too much.” And it all wraps around to her love of GC. Stine’s favorite movie is the Notebook. “I love the Notebook. It reminds me of my grandparents.” She went on to tell her favorite book, which is the Bible. “I started reading the Bible, going to Bible studies, and I’m learning all about that, because it’s very life changing, and it’s something you can live on.” Stine also stated that her hero is her grandpa.

Girls golf continues individual success, teamwork

by Dylan Ramirez/Staff Writer

Photo Caption: Sydnie Wherry, 12, finishes up a hole at the county meet on August 30. The girls placed third at this event.

 The girls golf team is one of the most successful sports for Greenfield Central with many accomplishments. With this year speeding up, the girls golf coach and two of their most valuable players answered some questions. So far the team is 1-1-1. Russell Wiley, the golf coach, is a teacher who has been teaching for 15 years at Greenfield Central. He has also coached the girls golf team for 11 years and the boys golf team for 7. “Learning the importance of hard work, building skills, work ethic, and being able to get through something difficult since golf is such a skilled sport,” said Coach Russel Wiley when asked what he wanted his team to get out of being on the golf team. 

   Coach Wiley is always on sight to improve his team any way he can. Some of his goals this year is to “finish better than we started — looking back at our first scores and see how much we improved. Also to make it to regionals is always one of our top goals.”   Coach Wiley doesn’t feel pressure, but when the girls do, he likes to ease the pressure and talk them through and make sure they don’t mess up.

  Sydnie Wherry, 12, one of Greenfield’s most valuable players, has been on a roll. With a great match just a week ago, she shot a 39. Whenever she is under pressure, she likes to “take deep breaths and don’t stress over a ball.”  She talks about what she likes most about being on the team. “The girls. They can definitely be a lot, but a special group of people. They are some of the best people to be around, when they don’t stress me out.” 

   Wherry has golfed since she was small, but started playing competitively since seventh grade. She enjoys going to Grandview Golf course once a month with her family. She also likes Hawks Tail. “I love Hawks Tail, mainly because I practice there a lot and go on my off days. I just know the course by heart.” Wherry offered some helpful words of advice to other golf players. “It is harder to keep composure than stress out and throw a tantrum. Never stress over one ball because if you stay angry at one ball, from there to the next shot or hole, you’re going to fall apart.” 

   Ella Neil, 11, another player on the golf team, enjoys being on the team and getting so close with the girls. She golfs almost every day besides Saturday. She golfs with the team all week, then golfs solo on Sundays. “On days I don’t have required practice, I like to go alone and practice difficult shots or just play a fun 9,” said Neil when asked what she likes to do on off days.  This shows how much work she puts into this sport. Neil loves her 7-iron and her driver; those are her go-to clubs. Neil ended the interview with some more advice for golf players. “Don’t get discouraged, even if you hit a bad shot. Just keep going. It’s not the end of the world,” she said.